Tom Bowman Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.
Tom Bowman 2010
Stories By

Tom Bowman

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tom Bowman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Bowman

Pentagon Reporter

Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.

In his current role, Bowman has traveled to Syria as well as Iraq and Afghanistan often for month-long visits and embedded with U.S. Marines and soldiers.

Before coming to NPR in April 2006, Bowman spent nine years as a Pentagon reporter at The Baltimore Sun. Altogether he was at The Sun for nearly two decades, covering the Maryland Statehouse, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the National Security Agency (NSA). His coverage of racial and gender discrimination at NSA led to a Pentagon investigation in 1994.

Initially Bowman imagined his career path would take him into academia as a history, government, or journalism professor. During college Bowman worked as a stringer at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, Mass. He also worked for the Daily Transcript in Dedham, Mass., and then as a reporter at States News Service, writing for the Miami Herald and the Anniston (Ala.) Star.

Bowman is a co-winner of a 2006 National Headliners' Award for stories on the lack of advanced tourniquets for U.S. troops in Iraq. In 2010, he received an Edward R. Murrow Award for his coverage of a Taliban roadside bomb attack on an Army unit.

Bowman earned a Bachelor of Arts in history from St. Michael's College in Winooski, Vermont, and a master's degree in American Studies from Boston College.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, center, walks on the red carpet with Afghan officials as they review an honor guard at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on March 21. President Biden said the U.S. will withdraw all remaining troops from the country by Sept. 11, ending the U.S. involvement in the America's longest-ever war. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Biden Plans For U.S. Troops To Be Out Of Afghanistan By Sept. 11 Of This Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986929452/986929453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin visits National Guard troops deployed at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 29. The troops were deployed in the wake of the Jan. 6 Capitol attack. Under Austin's order, all military units are holding "stand downs" to discuss extremism in the ranks. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Military Confronts Extremism, One Conversation At A Time

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984700148/984783304" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How The Military's Attempt To Tackle Extremism In Its Ranks Is Progressing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984353144/984353145" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Is On Track To Miss May 1 Deadline To Pull All Troops Out Of Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/978832035/978832036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This Jan. 4 photo shows Chinese People's Liberation Army soldiers assembling during military training at Pamir Mountains in Kashgar, northwestern China's Xinjiang region. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Strike On Syria Targets Iranian-Backed Militia Groups

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971617636/972001352" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

White House To Review Plan To Pull Troops Out Of Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/968577344/968577345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally on Jan. 6. So far, military veterans account for about 15% of those criminally charged in the Capitol riot, according to an NPR analysis. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Capitol Riot Prompts A Reckoning Over Extremism In The Ranks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/965951696/966199682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Celebrations Abound In Nation's Capital On Inauguration Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958905637/958905638" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The FBI informed the Defense Department of 68 current and former military members who were investigated in domestic extremism probes in 2020, according to a senior defense official. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Pandemic, Capitol Breach Force Biden's Inauguration Team To Adapt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956315537/956315538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Latest On Occupation Of The U.S. Capitol Building By Pro-Trump Extremists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/954149244/954181746" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Surrounded by Army cadets, President Trump watches the Army-Navy football game at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., on Dec. 12. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Army cadets make their way through campus at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., in 2007. This week, over 70 cadets were accused of cheating on an exam — the worst academic scandal since 1976, instructors say. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images