Tom Bowman Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.
Tom Bowman 2010
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Tom Bowman

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Tom Bowman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Tom Bowman

Pentagon Reporter

Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.

In his current role, Bowman has traveled to Syria as well as Iraq and Afghanistan often for month-long visits and embedded with U.S. Marines and soldiers.

Before coming to NPR in April 2006, Bowman spent nine years as a Pentagon reporter at The Baltimore Sun. Altogether he was at The Sun for nearly two decades, covering the Maryland Statehouse, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the National Security Agency (NSA). His coverage of racial and gender discrimination at NSA led to a Pentagon investigation in 1994.

Initially Bowman imagined his career path would take him into academia as a history, government, or journalism professor. During college Bowman worked as a stringer at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, Mass. He also worked for the Daily Transcript in Dedham, Mass., and then as a reporter at States News Service, writing for the Miami Herald and the Anniston (Ala.) Star.

Bowman is a co-winner of a 2006 National Headliners' Award for stories on the lack of advanced tourniquets for U.S. troops in Iraq. In 2010, he received an Edward R. Murrow Award for his coverage of a Taliban roadside bomb attack on an Army unit.

Bowman earned a Bachelor of Arts in history from St. Michael's College in Winooski, Vermont, and a master's degree in American Studies from Boston College.

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Gen. Charles Brown Jr. To Become 1st Black Military Service Chief

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National Guard soldiers take part in desert training at Fort Irwin, Calif. Tom Bowman hide caption

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Tom Bowman

U.S. Army To Soldiers As Training Resumes: 'Get Your Masks On'

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People protest against the military coup in Istanbul on July 16, 2016. Turkish military forces on July 16 opened fire on crowds gathered in Istanbul following a coup attempt, causing casualties, an AFP photographer said. OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OZAN KOSE/AFP via Getty Images

'Maybe I'm Not As Safe As Before': Turkish Admiral Seeking Asylum In U.S. Speaks Out

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Air Force Gen. John Hyten speaks at Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska during a change of command ceremony at U.S. Strategic Command in November. Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley is behind, listening. Hyten is now vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Pentagon's No. 2 Officer Says Military Must Do Better On Diversity

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Members of the medical staff treat a patient in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on July 2, in Houston, Texas. More than 700 military health professionals are being sent to regions with spikes in coronavirus cases, including Houston. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Esper And Milley Testify On Military's Role In Handling Recent Protests

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President Trump walking from the White House to St. John's Church on June 1. Gen. Mark Milley (far right), chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was among those walking behind the president. Milley says his presence was "a mistake" that he has learned from, but the incident has prompted discussions about how the military can maintain nonpartisanship within the Trump administration. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, seen last year, is one of the shipyards getting an influx of reservists to handle a work backlog caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Trump Confirms He Plans To Move Some Troops Out Of Germany

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Then U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates walks from an Osprey aircraft after landing at Forward Operating Base Dwyer on June 5, 2011 in Kandahar province, Afghanistan. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Gen. Mark Milley Apologizes For Appearing In A Photo-Op With President Trump

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Top General Apologizes For Role In Trump's Photo During Protests

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U.S. Army Will Not Be Changing The Names Of Army Bases Named For Confederates

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A sign at Fort Bragg, N.C., one of the army bases named after a Confederate leader. As the nation erupts in protests over police treatment of African Americans, these base names are coming under scrutiny — again. Chris Seward/AP hide caption

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Former Military Leaders Criticize Trump's Actions With Protesters

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