Tom Bowman Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.
Tom Bowman 2010
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Tom Bowman

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Tom Bowman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Bowman

Pentagon Reporter

Tom Bowman is a NPR National Desk reporter covering the Pentagon.

In his current role, Bowman has traveled to Syria as well as Iraq and Afghanistan often for month-long visits and embedded with U.S. Marines and soldiers.

Before coming to NPR in April 2006, Bowman spent nine years as a Pentagon reporter at The Baltimore Sun. Altogether he was at The Sun for nearly two decades, covering the Maryland Statehouse, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the National Security Agency (NSA). His coverage of racial and gender discrimination at NSA led to a Pentagon investigation in 1994.

Initially Bowman imagined his career path would take him into academia as a history, government, or journalism professor. During college Bowman worked as a stringer at The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, Mass. He also worked for the Daily Transcript in Dedham, Mass., and then as a reporter at States News Service, writing for the Miami Herald and the Anniston (Ala.) Star.

Bowman is a co-winner of a 2006 National Headliners' Award for stories on the lack of advanced tourniquets for U.S. troops in Iraq. In 2010, he received an Edward R. Murrow Award for his coverage of a Taliban roadside bomb attack on an Army unit.

Bowman earned a Bachelor of Arts in history from St. Michael's College in Winooski, Vermont, and a master's degree in American Studies from Boston College.

Story Archive

An American lieutenant, center, meets with villagers in Afghanistan's Kunar province in 2009, assisted by an interpreter, sitting to his right wearing a baseball cap. The U.S. will begin the evacuation of some 18,000 Afghan nationals who aided military operations, along with their families, in late July. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

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David Guttenfelder/AP

Evacuation Of Afghan Interpreters And Others Who Aided U.S. To Begin In Late July

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American And Afghan Officials Dispute The Details Of U.S. Pullout From Bagram

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Blast walls and a few buildings can be seen Monday at Bagram Airfield after the U.S. military left the Afghan base in Parwan province north of Kabul. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

U.S. Military Has Withdrawn From Largest Base In Afghanistan, Handed Over Control

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What The U.S.'s Relationship With Afghanistan Will Look Like Moving Forward

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Defense Secretary Says He Supports Reform To Military Justice System

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Fearing Taliban Retribution, Afghans Who Worked For U.S. Seek Visas

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America Marks Beginning Of Withdrawal Of Troops From Afghanistan

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Afghan army commandos train at the Shorab military camp in Helmand province, in southern Afghanistan, in 2017. With U.S. and NATO forces leaving in the coming months, the Afghan forces will have to confront the Taliban without support from Western countries. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, center, walks on the red carpet with Afghan officials as they review an honor guard at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on March 21. President Biden said the U.S. will withdraw all remaining troops from the country by Sept. 11, ending the U.S. involvement in the America's longest-ever war. AP hide caption

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Biden Plans For U.S. Troops To Be Out Of Afghanistan By Sept. 11 Of This Year

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