Emily Sullivan
Emily Sullivan, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Emily Sullivan

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Ashley Merson and her brother Kevin sit on the porch of the house Ashley is trying to buy in the Hampden neighborhood of Baltimore. A ransomware attack on the city's digital services has delayed the home purchase. Emily Sullivan/WYPR hide caption

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Emily Sullivan/WYPR

Ransomware Cyberattacks Knock Baltimore's City Services Offline

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Baltimore Residents React To Raid Of Mayor's Offices

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Federal Agents Raid Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh's Home, Office And Nonprofit

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A U.S. Postal Service letter carrier delivers the mail in Shelbyville, Ky. A White House task force recommended ending the mailbox monopoly held by USPS. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Your Mailbox Could Be Opened Up To Private Carriers

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Even the Federal Reserve has noticed ghosting, which it defines as "a situation where a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact." Planet Flem/Getty Images hide caption

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Planet Flem/Getty Images

In A Hot Labor Market, Some Employees Are 'Ghosting' Bad Bosses

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Bill Kristol, the former editor-in-chief of the conservative magazine The Weekly Standard speaks at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C.in October. Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Kathy Kraninger listens during a Senate Banking Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., in July. On Thursday, she won Senate confirmation to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday. Stocks plunged for the second trading day in a row but recovered late in the day. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images