Emily Sullivan Emily Sullivan is a News Assistant for NPR's Business Desk.

Story Archive

A soldier in Syria's President Bashar al-Assad forces near the Yarmouk Palestinian camp in Damascus. Syria's government captured at least two villages from U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces east of the Euphrates River near the border with Iraq. Omar Sanadiki/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Omar Sanadiki/Reuters

Starbucks issued an apology on Twitter after Starbucks employees called the police on two black men who were allegedly trespassing in a Philadelphia store. Twitter hide caption

toggle caption
Twitter

Thousands of teachers and their supporters marched outside the Oklahoma state Capitol building during the third day of a statewide education walkout on April 4. The strike ended this week. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Heins/Getty Images

A laptop showing the Facebook logo is held alongside a Cambridge Analytica sign at the entrance to the London offices of Cambridge Analytica. The company's acting CEO, Alexander Tayler, is stepping down, and is the second CEO out since the data sharing scandal broke. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

After marrying in 1960 and divorcing in 1968, Harold Holland and Lillian Barnes are remarrying each other this year. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A Half-Century After Getting Divorced, This Couple Is Heading Back Down The Aisle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/600176308/600482908" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anti-abortion-rights demonstrators stand outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2014 after oral arguments over buffer zones around abortion clinics. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Ajmal Faqiri, third from left, interpreting for former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. Courtesy of No One Left Behind hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of No One Left Behind

An Afghan Military Interpreter Finds Footing In The U.S. Gig Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598256725/598695847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Frankie Cosmos' latest album is Vessel. Left to right: Lauren Martin, Luke Pyenson, Alex Bailey, Greta Kline. Loroto Productions hide caption

toggle caption
Loroto Productions

Frankie Cosmos Examines Fear, Fame And Womanhood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/598002383/598503654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Companies such as Playboy and Space X have deleted their official Facebook pages amid the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The social media giant is losing more than just profiles: Its market value has decreased by $80 billion. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Sunita Williams conducts routine maintenance during a stint aboard the International Space Station. Nowadays, the astronaut helps Boeing and SpaceX develop private spacecraft. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

A NASA Astronaut Stays In Orbit With SpaceX And Boeing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/596208439/596880513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, right, speaks with his disciples in this undated photo in Rajneeshpuram, Ore. Jack Smith/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jack Smith/AP

Religion, Libertarian Cults And The American West In 'Wild Wild Country'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/596723300/596745026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A young man records a voice note. A new dating app called Waving lets you swipe right on someone based only off short voice profiles. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Can You Choose A Romantic Partner Just By Their Voice? A Dating App Thinks So

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594671282/594671283" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript