Tara Boyle Tara Boyle is the supervising producer of Hidden Brain at NPR.
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Tara Boyle

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Tara Boyle 2018
Hugo Rojo/NPR

Tara Boyle

Supervising Producer, Hidden Brain

Tara Boyle is the supervising producer of NPR's Hidden Brain. In this role, Boyle oversees the production of both the Hidden Brain radio show and podcast, providing editorial guidance and support to host Shankar Vedantam and the shows' producers. Boyle also coordinates Shankar's Hidden Brain segments on Morning Edition and other NPR shows, and oversees collaborations with partners both internal and external to NPR. Previously, Boyle spent a decade at WAMU, the NPR station in Washington, D.C. She has reported for The Boston Globe, and began her career in public radio at WBUR in Boston.

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Taken in aggregate, the billions of online searches we make every day say a lot about our most private thoughts and biases. Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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I, Robot: Our Changing Relationship With Technology

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Death And The Great Beyond: How We Grapple With The Idea Of Dying

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We're All Gonna Die! How Fear Of Death Drives Our Behavior

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Finding Meaning At Work: How We Shape And Think About Our Jobs

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado.John Moore/Getty Images John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Every time you give in to your phone or computer that's buzzing with notifications, you pay a price: little by little, you lose your ability to focus. Veronica Grech/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Scarcity can make it difficult for us to focus on anything other than the problem right in front of us. Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images