Tara Boyle Tara Boyle is the supervising producer of Hidden Brain at NPR.
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Tara Boyle

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Tara Boyle 2018
Hugo Rojo/NPR

Tara Boyle

Supervising Producer, Hidden Brain

Tara Boyle is the supervising producer of NPR's Hidden Brain. In this role, Boyle oversees the production of both the Hidden Brain radio show and podcast, providing editorial guidance and support to host Shankar Vedantam and the shows' producers. Boyle also coordinates Shankar's Hidden Brain segments on Morning Edition and other NPR shows, and oversees collaborations with partners both internal and external to NPR. Previously, Boyle spent a decade at WAMU, the NPR station in Washington, D.C. She has reported for The Boston Globe, and began her career in public radio at WBUR in Boston.

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Researchers say we often recognize peer pressure in the actions of others — but not in our own choices. xubingruo/Getty Images hide caption

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Fashion Statement: Putting Your Mouth Where Your Money Is

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Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute humanlike qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Pets, Pests And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

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Mechanical Sex: The Relationship Between Intercourse And Intimacy

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Modern psychology shows that we all have a little bit of Narcissus in us. Most of us like people who remind us of ourselves — whether that is someone else with the same name or the same birthday. Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR

A recent study found that black doctors were more effective than non-black doctors at convincing black men to use preventative health services. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

People Like Us: How Our Identities Shape Health And Educational Success

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New research suggests that early investments in children's education can have benefits that last for more than one generation. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

The myth that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Facts Aren't Enough: The Psychology Of False Beliefs

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

The cereal ads we saw when we were 5 years old can still influence our buying decisions at 50. Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF

This Is Your Brain On Ads: How Mass Marketing Affects Our Minds

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Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

What are the reasons for the dramatic decline in anti-gay bias in the United States? Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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In March of 2017, the two sets of Bogotá twins, Jorge, William, Carlos and Wilber (left to right), gathered to celebrate Carlos's graduation. Diana Carolina/St. Martin's Press hide caption

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