Andrea Kissack Andrea Kissack is NPR's Chief Science Editor and head of the Science Desk.
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Andrea Kissack

Andrea Kissack

Chief Science Editor

Andrea Kissack is NPR's Chief Science Editor and head of the Science Desk, where she presides over NPR's coverage of scientific and medical research and policy. She also oversees the desk's coverage of global health, climate, food, and consumer health news.

Previously, Kissack served as the Deputy Senior Supervising Editor of the digital team on the Science desk, where she provided leadership, integration, and collaboration of the desk's work in visual, animation, text, graphics, and audio.

Prior to her time at NPR, Kissack worked at KQED, where she was Senior Editor for ten years of the station's award-winning multimedia science coverage. She also served as the Senior Producer for the California Report, KQED's statewide news service. In addition to having worked at other member stations including KLON in Long Beach and WUSF in Tampa, she has reported for KNX, the CBS affiliate in Los Angeles.

Kissack has shared her wealth of experience as a teacher of multimedia storytelling and broadcast journalism at several colleges and universities. She graduated from Ohio University and received her Master of Arts in telecommunication management.

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Tesla Motors plans to use a former Toyota-GM joint venture factory in California to build its Model S electric sedan. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Electric Vehicle Companies Tap Silicon Valley Cash

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A power cable from a vehicle charging station is seen plugged into the side of a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid in San Francisco.  Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In Search Of Charging Stations For Electric Cars

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The Chevy Volt is a plug-in hybrid. Drivers can extend their range by tapping into a gas tank. Photo courtesy of GM hide caption

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Photo courtesy of GM

Will Electric Cars Work For The Everyday Driver?

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This composite illustration shows what a proposed solar array built by Solargen Energy in the Panoche Valley would look like from ground level. Solargen Energy hide caption

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Solargen Energy

Salmon Ban Threatens California Fishermen

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