Kelsey Snell Kelsey Snell is the Congressional editor for NPR.
Kelsey Snell in 2018.
Stories By

Kelsey Snell

Allison Shelley/NPR
Kelsey Snell at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Kelsey Snell

Congressional Editor, Washington Desk

Kelsey Snell is the Congressional editor for NPR. She has covered Congress since 2010 for outlets including The Washington Post, Politico and National Journal. She has covered elections and Congress with a reporting specialty in budget, tax and economic policy. She has a graduate degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and an undergraduate degree in political science from DePaul University in Chicago.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., says she will call up a vote to try to remove House Speaker Mike Johnson, R-La., sometime next week. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

Wednesday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Monday

The dome of the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 4, 2023 in Washington, D.C. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Catie Dull/NPR

Tuesday

Friday

Tuesday

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, sits with Rep. Warren Davidson, R-Ohio (right), as Republicans try to elect him to be the new House speaker, at the Capitol on Tuesday. Behind him is former Speaker Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Thursday

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., won an internal Republican vote for House speaker, but Republicans remain divided and unsure whether he has the votes in the full House to be elected speaker. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images

Tuesday

Monday

Tuesday

A government shutdown is looming even though House Speaker Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and President Biden made an agreement earlier this year that was supposed to prevent this exact outcome. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Wednesday

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff nominee General Charles Brown Jr., arrives in the Capitol after his confirmation hearing in the Senate Armed Services Committee in July. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Thursday

Hunter Biden, President Joe Biden's son, exits Holy Spirit Catholic Church after attending mass with his father (out of frame) in Johns Island, S.C., on Aug. 13, 2022. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

Tuesday

Friday

Wednesday

Senate Republicans are facing continued questions about the health of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell after the Kentucky Republican suffered two public health incidents. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

McConnell tries to shift Senate focus from his health to spending

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197904583/1197997570" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

McConnell prepares for a busy month amid scrutiny over his ability to lead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197718256/1197722026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., center, is helped by, from left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, after the 81-year-old GOP leader froze at the microphones on July 26. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Lawmakers have a narrow window to approve a stopgap funding measure and avoid a possible government shutdown beginning in October. Leaders of the House and Senate say a temporary spending bill is needed to work on yearlong bills. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Friday

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., center, is helped by, from left, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, after the 81-year-old GOP leader froze at the microphones as he arrived for a news conference, at the Capitol in Washington on July 26. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Age ain't nothing but a number but for aging lawmakers, it's raising questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197120521/1197131232" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Thursday

Politicians now tend to be older than they've been historically. It's causing issues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197084257/1197084258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript