Ruth Sherlock International Correspondent, covering the Middle East
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Ruth Sherlock

Courtesy of Ruth Sherlock
Ruth Sherlock headshot
Courtesy of Ruth Sherlock

Ruth Sherlock

International Correspondent, covering the Middle East

Ruth Sherlock is an International Correspondent with National Public Radio. She's based in Beirut and reports on Syria and other countries around the Middle East. She was previously the United States Editor for the Daily Telegraph, covering the 2016 US election. Before moving to the US in the spring of 2015, she was the Telegraph's Middle East correspondent.

Sherlock reported from almost every revolution and war of the Arab Spring. She lived in Libya for the duration of the conflict, reporting from opposition front lines. In late 2011 she travelled to Syria, going undercover in regime held areas to document the arrest and torture of antigovernment demonstrators. As the war began in earnest, she hired smugglers to cross into rebel held parts of Syria from Turkey and Lebanon. She also developed contacts on the regime side of the conflict, and was given rare access in government held areas.

Her Libya coverage won her the Young Journalist of the Year prize at British Press Awards. In 2014, she was shortlisted at the British Journalism Awards for her investigation into the Syrian regime's continued use of chemical weapons. She has twice been a finalist for the Gaby Rado Award with Amnesty International for reporting with a focus on human rights. With NPR, in 2020, her reporting for the Embedded podcast was shortlisted for the prestigious Livingston Award.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Encore: Seagulls near Beirut's airport lured by uncollected trash

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Monday

Menacing seagulls near Beirut's airport are lured there by uncollected trash

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Friday

People in Beirut are still looking for justice after the 2020 port explosion

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Wednesday

ICARDA lab employee Bilal Inaty cuts a lentil plant in order to test it for various diseases at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on Dec. 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds from the Fertile Crescent could help save us from climate change

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Wednesday

Seeds developed over thousands of years may help farmers adapt to climate change

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Wednesday

Syrians struggle with soaring prices, currency collapse and fuel shortages

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Saturday

Lebanese activists gather outside a local bank in support of Abed Soubra, who stormed the branch demanding access to his own accounts, in Beirut on Sept 16. Lebanese police detained Soubra after he entered the bank and, armed with a gun, demanded access to his deposits. It was the third such incident in Lebanon that week alone. Marwan Naamani/Picture Alliance/Getty Images hide caption

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Marwan Naamani/Picture Alliance/Getty Images

People in Lebanon are robbing banks and staging sit-ins to access their own savings

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Thursday

Kurdish forces hope U.S. allies will convince Turkey to stop air strikes

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Monday

Lebanese people are staging robberies and sit-ins to access their bank accounts

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Friday

A baby born on a migrant rescue boat and his mother were allowed into Italy

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Saturday

Oil and gas companies' participation in climate conferences may be doing more harm than good

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Friday

Biden says the U.S. is leading global warming action, but it may not be enough

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Thursday

The climate summit is drawing attention to Egypt's poor human rights record

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Tuesday

Muhammad Shehbaz Sharif, prime minister of Pakistan, listens to speeches during the conference. He took the stage today, as well, explaining the impact of catastrophic flooding in Pakistan this summer. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Monday

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, listens to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, giving a speech during the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP