Tim Mak Tim Mak is a political reporter for NPR.
Tim Mak in 2018.
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Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Political Reporter

Tim Mak covers national security and politics for NPR.

His reporting interests include congressional investigations, foreign interference in American election campaigns and the effects of technology on politics.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on foreign affairs. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk, and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

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House Judiciary Chairman Issues Subpoena For Full, Unredacted Mueller Report

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Questions Remain After Redacted Mueller Report Is Released

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What The Mueller Report Says About The Trump Campaign's Russian Contacts

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In this March 24, 2019 photo, The White House is seen behind security barriers in Washington. A White House official turned whistleblower says dozens of people in President Donald Trump's administration were granted access to classified information despite "disqualifying issues" in their backgrounds including concerns about foreign influence, drug use and criminal conduct. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Whistleblower Protections Key Tool To Investigators Probing Waste And Abuse Of Power

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Whistleblower Protection Act Has Earned Bipartisan Support In The Last 30 Years

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How President Trump's Angry Tweets Can Ripple Across Social Media

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House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., debated with ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., (right) about his move to subpoena the Justice Department to obtain an unredacted copy of the Mueller report at a committee markup Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House intelligence committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and other House Democratic chairs are pushing forward with investigations of related to President Trump following the report from special counsel Robert Mueller on the 2016 election. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senior adviser to the President Jared Kushner used private email and a messaging app to conduct official business, the House oversight committee says. Kushner's lawyer has pushed back on some of the committee's assertions. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Kushner Used Private Email To Conduct Official Business, House Committee Says

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Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., who chairs the House Transportation Committee wants to work with the White House on a bipartisan infrastructure bill. At the same time, his panel is investigating a lease given to the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senate Expected To Vote Against Trump's Emergency Declaration

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Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., chairman of the House intelligence committee, argues there's already sufficient evidence in public to support an indictment of President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP