Tim Mak Tim Mak is a political reporter for NPR.
Tim Mak in 2018.
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Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Political Reporter

Tim Mak covers national security and politics for NPR.

His reporting topics include investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, as well as the potential for future interference by foreign actors; challenges to America's democratic institutions; as well as the conservative movement and Republicans in the context of the 2018 elections.

Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on foreign affairs. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk, and at the Washington Examiner. He covered the rise of the Tea Party movement in 2009 and 2010 for FrumForum. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

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Story Archive

Volunteers look at ballots during a hand recount in Palm Beach, Florida. The recount decided the election in favor of the Republican candidates for Senate and governor but election experts warn that similar problems could crop up again in 2020 if the state doesn't address them immediately. Saul Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Martinez/Getty Images

Florida Recount: GOP Wins Senate And Gubernatorial Elections

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Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz. (left), and Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., speak to members of the media during a news conference Wednesday on the Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Christine Blasey Ford (center), flanked by attorneys Debra Katz and Michael Bromwich. The attorneys say that although Ford has tried to return to her life, she endures harassment. Tom Williams/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/Pool/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Accuser Christine Blasey Ford Continues Receiving Threats, Lawyers Say

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Jessica Jones (center) speaks to people gathered around the Ben & Jerry's "Yes on 4" Truck about Florida's Amendment 4 initiative at Charles Hadley Park in Miami, on Oct. 22. Amendment 4 asked voters to restore the voting rights of people with past felony convictions. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

People protest the arrival of President Trump as he visits the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh on Tuesday. Many Americans fear more violence in U.S. political life. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Another 'Civil War'? Pessimism About Political Violence Deepens In A Divided Nation

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Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., leaves a meeting on Capitol Hill in January. The House Intelligence Committee chairman is locked in a fierce re-election battle. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Devin Nunes' Re-Election Tests Whether All Politics Are Now National

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a press conference about the apprehension of a suspect in the recent spate of mail bombings at the Department of Justice on October 26, 2018 in Washington, DC. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

While President Trump called for unity at a campaign rally in Wisconsin on Wednesday, he has also criticized the news media. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Lexi Sturdy, election war room lead, sits at her desk during a demonstration in the war room, where Facebook monitors election-related content on the platform, in Menlo Park, Calif., on Oct. 17. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Facebook, Exploited By Influence Campaigns, Tries To Clamp Down With 'War Room'

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As Midterms Approach, Facebook Ramps Up Disinformation Fight

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Kavanaugh Has The Votes To Be Confirmed To The Supreme Court

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How Will The Senate Vote On Kavanaugh? Not All Votes Are Known Yet

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on 'Foreign Influence Operations and Their Use of Social Media Platforms' on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018, in Washington. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP