Tim Mak Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.
Tim Mak in 2018.
Stories By

Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Washington Investigative Correspondent

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

An NPR investigation has identified unusual decisions around the process that lead to a Pittsburgh company winning a contract to gather COVID-19 data instead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Irregularities In COVID Reporting Contract Award Process Raise New Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896645314/896980237" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How Small Tech Company Got $10.2 Million Contract To Build COVID-19 Database

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896840037/896840038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Government Watchdogs Point Out Poor Implementation Of CARES Act's Oversight Measures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/891563642/891563643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

DC Statue Of Lincoln Standing Over A Formerly Enslaved Man Sparks Controversy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/884213464/884213465" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Government Accountability Office says the IRS did not use death records for the first three batches of coronavirus relief payments — which account for 72% of the nearly $270 billion in payments dispensed so far. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Travelers make their way through ticketing and TSA inspection at the Pittsburgh International Airport on May 7. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Whistleblower: TSA Failed To Protect Staff, Endangered Passengers During Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880564586/880754450" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A walker passes the names of George Floyd and Eric Garner spelled out in fabric at the Say Their Names: Silver Lake Memorial on June 9 in Los Angeles. There has been a recent push for a nationwide ban on police chokeholds. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Pizzello/AP

How Decades Of Bans On Police Chokeholds Have Fallen Short

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/877527974/877778860" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protests Over Police Brutality Continue In D.C.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/871520147/871520148" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thousands of people marched in Washington, D.C., to protest the death of George Floyd. The show of law enforcement at the protest Saturday appeared lighter in comparison with other recent demonstrations in which large contingents of police and National Guard troops were deployed. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eman Mohammed for NPR

Facebook Becomes Key Place For Extremist Boogaloo Movement Organizers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/871404652/871404653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

View from the Ground At Washington DC Protests; Misinformation Spreads Online

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/869989744/870007615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Peace Prevails After Another Night Of Protests For George Floyd

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/868469793/868469794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump Promises Dramatic Action To End Violent Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/867578094/867578095" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump Addresses The Nation And Walks To 'The Church Of Presidents'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/867476410/869092254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript