Tim Mak Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.
Tim Mak in 2018.
Stories By

Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Washington Investigative Correspondent

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

Story Archive

Sunday

What it's like to spend a winter in the trenches, according to Ukrainian soldiers

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Tuesday

Foreign businesses in Ukraine, such as Uber, look ahead to a post-war Ukraine

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Tuesday

People in Odesa try to do business even after Russian attacks leave them in the dark

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Saturday

Friday

Russian President Putin orders a temporary cease-fire in Ukraine

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Monday

Russian air attacks continue to target Ukraine's energy infrastructure

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Saturday

People gather at the bottom of a hotel, which has been partially destroyed by a Russian strike in the center of the Ukrainian capital Kyiv on Saturday. Sergei Supinsky /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky /AFP via Getty Images

Ukraine marks the end of a year almost entirely spent under attack

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Thursday

Russia is finishing the year with continued strikes on Ukraine's electrical grid

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Saturday

In Odesa, Ukrainians celebrate Hanukkah in a city without power

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Friday

Why Christmas in Ukraine may be celebrated on Dec. 25 or Jan. 7

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Wednesday

Zelenskyy visits Washington to meet with Biden and address Congress

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Friday

Civilians sit on an escalator while taking shelter inside a metro station during an air raid alert in the center of Kyiv on Dec. 16, 2022. A fresh barrage of Russian strikes hit cities across Ukraine early on Friday. Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP via Getty Images

Saturday

Oleksandr Breus, a Ukrainian and onetime French legionnaire, was killed next to his car during the Russian invasion. Oleksandr Holod, who says he witnessed it from his window, describes events as he rides his bike past the charred remains of the vehicle near Nova Basan, Chernihiv Oblast, Ukraine on June 28. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

There have been 50,000 alleged war crimes in Ukraine. We worked to solve one

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Thursday

A look into one of 50 thousand war crimes under investigation in Ukraine

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