Tim Mak Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.
Tim Mak in 2018.
Stories By

Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Washington Investigative Correspondent

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

Story Archive

Charlton Heston (left), then president of the NRA, meets with fellow leaders Wayne LaPierre (far right) and Jim Baker (center) on April 30, 1999, ahead of the NRA's annual meeting in Denver. Around the same time, leaders discussed how to respond to the shooting at Columbine High School in nearby Littleton, Colo. More than 20 years later, NPR has obtained secret recordings of those conversations. Kevin Moloney/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Moloney/Getty Images

A secret tape made after Columbine shows the NRA's evolution on school shootings

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Do Lawmakers Have More Insight Into Stocks Than The Public? TikTok Users Think So.

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A community of young investors on TikTok, including @ceowatchlist, @quicktrades and @irisapp, are using House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's stock trading disclosures as inspiration for where to invest themselves. One user called Pelosi the market's "biggest whale," while another called her the "queen of investing." @ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok hide caption

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@ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok

TikTokers Are Trading Stocks By Copying What Members Of Congress Do

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The National Rifle Association's annual meeting featuring thousands of supporters listening to high-profile speakers fueled its influence. But for the past two years, the crowds had to stay home. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The NRA Cancels Its Annual Meeting Again, Underscoring The Group's Uncertain Future

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An information board shows people who are wanted by law enforcement on suspicion of assaulting federal officers at the U.S. Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot. Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images

The FBI Keeps Using Clues From Volunteer Sleuths To Find The Jan. 6 Capitol Rioters

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NPR spoke to more than a dozen current and former employees of One Medical. They say the high-end medical company has fundamentally changed its focus, with increasing revenue and reducing costs taking center stage. DrAfter123/Getty Images hide caption

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DrAfter123/Getty Images

One Medical Employees Say Concierge Care Provider Is Putting Profits Over Patients

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Trump supporters breach security and storm inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The woman in blue with her fist raised was later identified as Suzanne Ianni. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department Is Struggling To Bring Capitol Riot Cases To Trial: Here's Why

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"My goal for this year ... was simple," Proud Boys Chairman Enrique Tarrio tells NPR. "Start getting more involved in local politics." Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Some Proud Boys Are Moving To Local Politics As Scrutiny Of Far-Right Group Ramps Up

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A new report says a division within the Department of Homeland Security missed signs of potential violence before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Report: DHS Division Failed To Analyze Intelligence Ahead Of Capitol Violence

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NRA Bankruptcy Case Dismissed By Judge, Heightens Risk For Group's Dissolution

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National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre at the group's annual meeting in Dallas in May 2018. A secretive figure, LaPierre makes few public appearances outside of carefully scripted speeches. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Dismisses NRA Bankruptcy Case, Heightening Risk For Dissolution Of Group

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The FBI has released a substantial amount of information, including surveillance video, about the unidentified bomb-maker. FBI/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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FBI/screenshot by NPR

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

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The NRA Has Been Quiet As The Gun Rights Debate Reignites

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