Tim Mak Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.
Tim Mak in 2018.
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Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Washington Investigative Correspondent

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

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Story Archive

Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., speaks with reporters at the Capitol in February. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Justice Department Looking Into Senator's Stock Sell-Off

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$2 Trillion Coronavirus Package Has Built-In Accountability Steps

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Sen. Richard Burr Faces Lawsuit Over Timing Of Stock Sale

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Senate Hopes To Pass Next Stimulus Bill On Monday

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Sen. Richard Burr Calls For Senate Ethics Committee To Review His Finances

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ProPublica: Sen. Burr Dumped Stock After Calming Public About Coronavirus

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Senate Intel Chair Sounded Coronavirus Alarm Weeks Ago In Private Meeting

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Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., pictured here in 2019, warned a small group of constituents on Feb. 27 about the impact of the coronavirus on the U.S., according to a secret recording obtained by NPR. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Weeks Before Virus Panic, Intelligence Chairman Privately Raised Alarm, Sold Stocks

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Tech Companies Aim To Stop COVID-19 Disinformation

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Syrian Defector To Testify Before Senate Panel About Regime's Atrocities

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Sen. Bernie Sanders pauses while speaking during a primary night rally in Essex Junction, Vt., on Tuesday. Sanders has gotten more positive support from Russian media than any other Democratic candidate. Kate Flock/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kate Flock/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Russia Is Trying To Boost Bernie Sanders' Campaign

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Alan Gross makes a statement after arriving back in the United States on Dec. 17, 2014. A U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor, Gross was imprisoned in Cuba for five years on espionage charges. He told NPR that Sen. Bernie Sanders visited him in detention and remarked that he didn't understand why others criticized Cuba. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Prisoner Recalls Sanders Saying, 'I Don't Know What's So Wrong' With Cuba

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It Appears Republican Probe Of Hunter Biden Is Heating Up

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