Tim Mak Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.
Tim Mak in 2018.
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Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Washington Investigative Correspondent

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

Story Archive

Ukraine: grain leaves port and calls grow for a probe into POWs' deaths

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The NRA's annual meeting is underway, with only minor changes

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Former President Trump speaks at the NRA convention in Houston

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CEO and executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, Wayne LaPierre, speaks during the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Houston. Toya Sarno Jordan for NPR hide caption

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Toya Sarno Jordan for NPR

The National Rifle Association begins its annual convention in Houston

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Charlton Heston (left), then president of the NRA, meets with fellow leaders Wayne LaPierre (far right) and Jim Baker (center) on April 30, 1999, ahead of the NRA's annual meeting in Denver. Around the same time, leaders discussed how to respond to the shooting at Columbine High School in nearby Littleton, Colo. More than 20 years later, NPR has obtained secret recordings of those conversations. Kevin Moloney/Getty hide caption

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How one city in southern Ukraine became a humanitarian hub

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Those in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, are struggling as the city runs out of food and gas

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While a hundred people escaped a Ukrainian steel plant, more are still trapped

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After atrocities, many Ukrainians aren't interested in negotiating peace with Russia

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A Ukrainian jazz club provides joy in Odesa despite the invasion

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Damaged military vehicles and a Ukrainian flag are seen at the partly destroyed steel plant in an area controlled by Russian-backed separatist forces in Mariupol on Monday. Alexei Alexandrov/AP hide caption

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Alexei Alexandrov/AP

Putin orders troops not to storm Mariupol's last holdout

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Ukrainian fighters are making their last stand in a steel mill in Mariupol

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Ukrainian civilians living close to the frontlines say they feel trapped

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What life is like in the Ukrainian city of Mykolaiv

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