Tim Mak Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.
Tim Mak in 2018.
Stories By

Tim Mak

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tim Mak in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tim Mak

Washington Investigative Correspondent

Tim Mak is NPR's Washington Investigative Correspondent, focused on political enterprise journalism.

His reporting interests include the 2020 election campaign, national security and the role of technology in disinformation efforts.

He appears regularly on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and the NPR Politics Podcast.

Mak was one of NPR's lead reporters on the Mueller investigation and the Trump impeachment process. Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on national security. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk and at the Washington Examiner. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also currently holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Far-right extremist "Boogaloo boys" stand on the steps of the capitol in Lansing, Mich., during a rally on Oct. 17. Michigan is one of five states with the highest risk of increased militia activity around the elections, according to a new report. Seth Herald/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Herald/Getty Images

Here's Where The Threat Of Militia Activity Around The Elections Is The Highest

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/926339006/926538196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

TeleTracking was awarded a contract to collect COVID-19 data from the nation's hospitals despite no previous experience working on this sort of data collection. And its system has been plagued by inconsistencies and errors. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

toggle caption
Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

So far, few deepfakes have been used this political season. It's not because they aren't a potential threat, but because simpler deceptive tactics are still effective at spreading misinformation. amtitus/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
amtitus/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Where Are The Deepfakes In This Presidential Election?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/918223033/919006747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy arrives at an Aug. 5 meeting at the office of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Who Is Louis DeJoy? U.S. Postmaster General In Spotlight Ahead Of 2020 Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/904346060/904598707" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin attend a joint press conference after a July 2018 meeting in Helsinki. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Report: Former Trump Aide Paul Manafort Shared Campaign Info With Russia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903512647/903561857" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Senate Intelligence Report Outlines Russian Influence In 2016

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903548238/903550385" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York Attorney General Seeks To Dissolve NRA

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/899881948/899881949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Letitia James, New York's attorney general, pauses while speaking during a news conference on Aug. 6, 2020, where she announced a civil action seeking to dissolve the National Rifle Association. Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An NPR investigation has identified unusual decisions around the process that lead to a Pittsburgh company winning a contract to gather COVID-19 data instead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Irregularities In COVID Reporting Contract Award Process Raise New Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896645314/896980237" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

How Small Tech Company Got $10.2 Million Contract To Build COVID-19 Database

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896840037/896840038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Government Watchdogs Point Out Poor Implementation Of CARES Act's Oversight Measures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/891563642/891563643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

DC Statue Of Lincoln Standing Over A Formerly Enslaved Man Sparks Controversy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/884213464/884213465" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Government Accountability Office says the IRS did not use death records for the first three batches of coronavirus relief payments — which account for 72% of the nearly $270 billion in payments dispensed so far. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP