Rhitu Chatterjee Rhitu Chatterjee is a health correspondent with NPR, with a focus on mental health.
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Rhitu Chatterjee

Encore: When teens threaten violence, a community responds with compassion

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A bookmark advertising the 988 suicide and crisis lifeline emergency telephone number displayed by a volunteer with the Natrona County Suicide Prevention Task Force, in Casper, Wyoming on August 14, 2022. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Twin sisters Tripti and Pari, who lost both their parents to COVID-19, play at a relative's home in Bhopal, India on May 11, 2021. A new study estimates that 8 million kids lost a parent or primary caregiver to a pandemic-related cause. Gagan Nayar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gagan Nayar/AFP via Getty Images

Nearly 8 million kids lost a parent or primary caregiver to the pandemic

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As kids return to school this fall, educators are prepared to deal with the continued mental health fallout of the disruptions of the pandemic. martinedoucet/Getty Images hide caption

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martinedoucet/Getty Images

As school starts, teachers add a mental-health check-in to their lesson plans

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A new school year brings fresh concerns about the mental health of students

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Mental health workers say they plan to strike

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Tomeka Kimbrough-Hilson was diagnosed with uterine fibroids in 2006 and underwent surgery to remove a non-cancerous mass. When she started experiencing symptoms again in 2020, she was unable to get an appointment with a gynecologist. Her experience was not uncommon, according to a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Nicole Buchanan for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Buchanan for NPR

A 'staggering' number of people couldn't get care during the pandemic, poll finds

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DELRAY, FL - MAY 23, 2022: (L-R) Alexandra Iriarte, Elizabeth George, Janaya Stephens, Paris Jackson, Mario Guillaume and Keanna Tyson during a group session in their grief support group also knows as Steve's Club held during school hours at Atlantic High School in Delray Beach, Florida on May 23, 2022. Saul Martinez for NPR hide caption

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Saul Martinez for NPR

Losing a parent can derail teens' lives. A high school grief club aims to help

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More than 91,000 people in the U.S. died from drug overdoses in 2020. There were sharp increases among certain racial groups, a new report finds. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Calling 988 in the U.S. will now get you help for a mental health crisis

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The new 3-digit suicide hotline number is launching this weekend. Are states ready?

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Identifying with their pain, a teacher made a club for students who've lost a parent

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CDC OKs vaccinations for children 6 months to 5 years old

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A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines will soon be available for children as young as 6 months old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images