Ayesha Rascoe Ayesha Rascoe is a White House correspondent for NPR.
Ayesha Rascoe at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Ayesha Rascoe

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Ayesha Rascoe at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ayesha Rascoe

White House Correspondent

Ayesha Rascoe is a White House correspondent for NPR. She is currently covering her third presidential administration. Rascoe's White House coverage has included a number of high profile foreign trips, including President Trump's 2019 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi, Vietnam, and President Obama's final NATO summit in Warsaw, Poland in 2016. As a part of the White House team, she's also a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to joining NPR, Rascoe covered the White House for Reuters, chronicling Obama's final year in office and the beginning days of the Trump administration. Rascoe began her reporting career at Reuters, covering energy and environmental policy news, such as the 2010 BP oil spill and the U.S. response to the Fukushima nuclear crisis in 2011. She also spent a year covering energy legal issues and court cases.

She graduated from Howard University in 2007 with a B.A. in journalism.

Story Archive

President Biden speaks Wednesday at a Mack Trucks facility in Macungie, Pa., about the importance of U.S. manufacturing and buying products made in America. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Actress and author Emilia Clarke. Robert Ascroft/Narrative PR hide caption

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Emilia Clarke On Mothers Of Madness And Dragons

The "Mother of Dragons" is out with a new comic book, Mother of Madness. Actress Emilia Clarke talks with guest host Ayesha Rascoe about superpowers in real life and fantasy, her career-launching role in Game of Thrones and how Hollywood has changed since her first season as Daenerys.

Emilia Clarke On Mothers Of Madness And Dragons

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Left to Right Aliah Cotman, Ashley White, Shakiyla McPherson and Lucia Boursiquot attend The Black Hair Experience at the National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md. on Saturday July 17, 2021. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

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Dee Dwyer for NPR

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

The Black Hair Experience is a pop-up visual exhibit dedicated to the beauty, history and nostalgia of Black hair. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe takes a trip there and chats with its co-founder, Alisha Brooks. Then, Ayesha is joined by NPR's Susan Davis and Asma Khalid about the two huge economic priorities for the Biden administration.

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

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Vicky Krieps, Thomasin McKenzie, Gael García Bernal and Luca Faustino Rodriguez in M. Night Shyamalan's new film Old. Phobymo/Universal Pictures hide caption

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Sonequa Martin-Green attends the premiere of Warner Bros Space Jam: A New Legacy at Regal LA Live on July 12, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. Amy Sussman/FilmMagic via Getty Images hide caption

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A "Help Wanted" sign posted in Brooklyn New York. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe brings on CBS MoneyWatch editor Irina Ivanova to break down some of the reasons why. Then, The New Republic staff writer Jo Livingstone joins Ayesha to discuss the current state of horror movies and why nothing's better than a good scare. Author and Big Mood, Little Mood podcast host Daniel Lavery joins them to play Who Said That.

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

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Donald Trump mocks Christine Blasey Ford's testimony during a rally in Southaven, Mississippi, on October 2, 2018. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's America And Why 'The Cruelty Is The Point'

The Cruelty Is The Point: The Past, Present, and Future of Trump's America, is journalist Adam Serwer's new book, based on a popular essay he wrote for The Atlantic. Serwer talks with guest host Ayesha Rascoe and lays out the ways in which Donald Trump came to power, the historical roots of his vision of law and order, and how he managed to build a loyal political following on the basis of cruelty.

Trump's America And Why 'The Cruelty Is The Point'

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Sha'Carri Richardson competes in the Women's 100 Meter on day 2 of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials at Hayward Field on June 19, 2021 in Eugene, Oregon. Andy Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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The Weight On Black Women In Sports; Plus, 'We Are Lady Parts'

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After Recent Blows To The Voting Rights Act, Biden Is Pressured To Step In

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Vin Diesel and Paul Walker in a scene from the film 'The Fast And The Furious', 2001. (Photo by Universal/Getty Images) Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Pop Culture Happy Hour: F9 Is Somehow Faster And Furious-er

Sam sits in the guest seat at Pop Culture Happy Hour to discuss the glue that holds this nation together — The Fast and the Furious franchise. Alongside NPR White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, as well as PCHH hosts Linda Holmes and Aisha Harris, the group talks about the legacy of the decades-spanning series, why we love to hate it, and how action films of this caliber could be considered "hetero camp."

Pop Culture Happy Hour: F9 Is Somehow Faster And Furious-er

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Candles and flowers decorate a makeshift memorial for Vanessa Guillén, a Fort Hood, Texas, soldier whose 2020 killing put a spotlight on sexual harassment in the U.S. military. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images