Ayesha Rascoe Ayesha Rascoe is a White House correspondent for NPR.
Ayesha Rascoe at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Ayesha Rascoe

Allison Shelley/NPR
Ayesha Rascoe at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ayesha Rascoe

White House Correspondent

Ayesha Rascoe is a White House correspondent for NPR. She is currently covering her third presidential administration. Rascoe's White House coverage has included a number of high profile foreign trips, including President Trump's 2019 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi, Vietnam, and President Obama's final NATO summit in Warsaw, Poland in 2016. As a part of the White House team, she's also a regular on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to joining NPR, Rascoe covered the White House for Reuters, chronicling Obama's final year in office and the beginning days of the Trump administration. Rascoe began her reporting career at Reuters, covering energy and environmental policy news, such as the 2010 BP oil spill and the U.S. response to the Fukushima nuclear crisis in 2011. She also spent a year covering energy legal issues and court cases.

She graduated from Howard University in 2007 with a B.A. in journalism.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

President Biden will welcome Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to the White House — but their meeting will be virtual due to COVID-19 constraints. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What Happened In Texas And Who Is To Blame?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/969543104/969560743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump Acquitted In Second Impeachment Trial

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/967741202/967749250" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks during a White House briefing on the Biden administration's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Image from video/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Image from video/AP

Some Advocates Worry Biden's Executive Actions On Racial Justice Are Too Weak

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/960855970/960855975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Politics Chat: Biden To Sign More Executive Orders In First Full Week As President

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/960060901/960060902" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There's A Vaccine Bottleneck. It's Hard To Say Why.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959716355/959729208" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden, joined by Vice President Harris and Dr. Anthony Fauci, signs executive actions as part of his administration's COVID-19 response on Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

For 1st Time In 150 Years, Outgoing President Doesn't Attend Inauguration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958905703/958905704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript