Alex Leff Alex Leff is a digital editor on NPR's International Desk, helping oversee coverage from journalists around the world for its growing Internet audience.
Alex Leff
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Alex Leff

MJ Minutoli/NPR
Alex Leff
MJ Minutoli/NPR

Alex Leff

Digital Editor, International Desk

Alex Leff is a digital editor on NPR's International Desk, helping oversee coverage from journalists around the world for its growing Internet audience. He was previously a senior editor at GlobalPost and PRI, where he wrote stories and edited the work of international correspondents.

Among his proud achievements, Leff helped edit GlobalPost's investigation into the Catholic Church's pattern of reshuffling priests accused of abuse into South American parishes, a series that won a Religion News Association award in 2016.

Earlier in his career, Leff reported in Spain and Costa Rica. In San José, Costa Rica, Alex was a reporter for Reuters, the online editor at The Tico Times newspaper and a correspondent with GlobalPost, among other outlets.

Born in Brooklyn, NY, Leff earned a master's in journalism in Spanish at the University of Barcelona in conjunction with Columbia University.

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A supporter of presidential candidate Ebrahim Raisi shows her hand with writing in Persian that reads "Raisi," during a rally in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday. He is the country's hard-line judiciary chief and is closely aligned with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Amin Nasser, president and chief executive officer of Saudi Aramco, speaks during the fourth edition of the Future Investment Initiative conference at the Ritz-Carlton hotel on Jan. 27, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Fayez Nureldine/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP via Getty Images

Lloyd Austin, U.S. secretary of defense, visits the National Cemetery in Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday. On his Asia tour, the defense chief made an unannounced visit to Afghanistan on Sunday. SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Health workers from Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, share an emotional embrace with their peers from a hospital in Jilin province at the Tianhe Airport. Colleagues who worked on the front lines together bid farewell as Wuhan lifted its coronavirus lockdown in April. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

Pope Francis attends a interreligious ceremony for peace Tuesday in the Basilica of Santa Maria in Aracoeli in Rome. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

Pope Francis Calls For Same-Sex Civil Union Law In New Documentary

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Then-Mexican Defense Secretary Gen. Salvador Cienfuegos (right) with then-U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at the Pentagon in 2017. Cienfuegos was arrested Thursday at Los Angeles International Airport. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

U.S. Arrests Mexico's Ex-Defense Chief, Accused Of Helping Drug Cartel

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Fausto Russo, 38, has been in a hospital bed in Latina, Italy, for more than two weeks with COVID-19. Courtesy of Fausto Russo hide caption

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Courtesy of Fausto Russo

Italian Fitness Coach With COVID-19: 'Feels Like Your Head Is Being Held Underwater'

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People gather in support of pro-democracy protesters during a lunch break rally in the Kwun Tong area in Hong Kong on Wednesday. Hong Kong has been battered by months of mass rallies and violent clashes between police and protesters who are demanding direct popular elections of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory's government, as well as an investigation into alleged police brutality. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Muguntuul Oyutan, 11, walks to school with her sister and friends in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia. Mongolia is the world's most sparsely populated nation, and an increasing proportion of its citizens reside in the capital. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

U.S. soldiers direct traffic outside the residence of the Peruvian ambassador to Panama, right rear, in Panama City on Jan. 9, 1990. In December 1989, U.S. President George H.W. Bush sent thousands of troops to Panama to arrest the country's leader, Manuel Noriega. John Gaps/AP hide caption

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John Gaps/AP

Trump's Venezuela Moves Follow Long History Of Intervention In Latin America

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