Deirdre Walsh
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Stories By

Deirdre Walsh

Allison Shelley/NPR
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Deirdre Walsh

Congressional Editor

Deirdre Walsh is the congress editor for NPR's Washington Desk.

Based in Washington, DC, Walsh manages a team of reporters covering Capitol Hill and political campaigns.

Before joining NPR in 2018, Walsh worked as a senior congressional producer at CNN. In her nearly 18-year career there, she was an off-air reporter and a key contributor to the network's newsgathering efforts, filing stories for CNN.com and producing pieces that aired on domestic and international networks. Prior to covering Capitol Hill, Walsh served as a producer for Judy Woodruff's Inside Politics.

Walsh was elected in August 2018 as the president of the Board of Directors for the Washington Press Club Foundation, a non-profit focused on promoting diversity in print and broadcast media. Walsh has won several awards for enterprise and election reporting, including the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress by the National Press Association, which she won in February 2013 along with CNN's Chief Congressional Correspondent Dana Bash. Walsh was also awarded the Joan Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based Congressional or Political Reporting in June 2013.

Walsh received a B.A. in political science and communications from Boston College.

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Story Archive

After a summer recess, members of Congress return to Washington to a long list of legislative items to address but little bipartisan cooperation to get major items passed. Mark Tenally/AP hide caption

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Mark Tenally/AP

Ahead of the 2020 elections, 15 Republican House members have announced plans to retire, including (from left) Republican Reps. Will Hurd of Texas, Martha Roby of Alabama, Pete Olson of Texas and Rob Woodall of Georgia. Bill Clark, Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark, Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Republican Rep. Mike Turner represents Dayton, Ohio, where a mass shooting occurred over the weekend. He opposed a House bill expanding background checks but came out in favor of measures to ban assault-style weapons and proposals for red-flag bills. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The president declared a national emergency in February to access federal money to build a wall similar to this razor-wire-covered border wall separating Nogalas, Mexico (left), and Nogales, Ariz. Congress did not approve the full amount he asked for last year to follow through on a key campaign pledge. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, hours after being sworn in on the House floor, profanely called to impeach the president, prompting her own leaders to distance themselves from her comments. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., celebrates the party's wins in the House of Representatives. Pelosi plans to run for speaker now that Democrats will control the House. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Trump shakes hands with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy during a rally this summer. If Republicans keep their majority, McCarthy could be the next speaker of the House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has outlined a legislative agenda that includes Democratic priorities like lowering prescription drug prices and overhauling campaign finance laws. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, has requested a response from Christine Blasey Ford about whether she will testify before the committee. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh leaves his home Wednesday in Chevy Chase, Md. Kavanaugh is scheduled to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday following an allegation of sexual misconduct from when was in high school. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Accuser Open To Testifying About Sexual Assault Allegations

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Some senators have called for the FBI to investigate an accusation of sexual assault against Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Getting that to happen is not straightforward, though. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, testifies during his is Senate Judiciary committee confirmation hearing on Sept. 6. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP