Deirdre Walsh
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Stories By

Deirdre Walsh

Allison Shelley/NPR
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Deirdre Walsh

Congressional Editor

Deirdre Walsh is the congress editor for NPR's Washington Desk.

Based in Washington, DC, Walsh manages a team of reporters covering Capitol Hill and political campaigns.

Before joining NPR in 2018, Walsh worked as a senior congressional producer at CNN. In her nearly 18-year career there, she was an off-air reporter and a key contributor to the network's newsgathering efforts, filing stories for CNN.com and producing pieces that aired on domestic and international networks. Prior to covering Capitol Hill, Walsh served as a producer for Judy Woodruff's Inside Politics.

Walsh was elected in August 2018 as the president of the Board of Directors for the Washington Press Club Foundation, a non-profit focused on promoting diversity in print and broadcast media. Walsh has won several awards for enterprise and election reporting, including the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress by the National Press Association, which she won in February 2013 along with CNN's Chief Congressional Correspondent Dana Bash. Walsh was also awarded the Joan Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based Congressional or Political Reporting in June 2013.

Walsh received a B.A. in political science and communications from Boston College.

Story Archive

Do Lawmakers Have More Insight Into Stocks Than The Public? TikTok Users Think So.

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7 Lawmakers Face Ethics Complaints For Not Filing Their Personal Stock Transactions

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Members of Congress are required to disclose their stock transactions under a law known as the STOCK Act, but an outside ethics group filed complaints noting that some lawmakers are violating the rules. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images; Carolyn Kaster/AP; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images; Melissa Lyttle/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images; Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images; Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images; Carolyn Kaster/AP; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images; Melissa Lyttle/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images; Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images; Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty

Outside Ethics Group Says 7 House Lawmakers Didn't Disclose Stock Trades

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Many Believe It's Time To Do Away With Lawmakers Making Stock Trades

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As Biden's Approval Rating Dips, Republicans Sharpen Their Message For The Midterms

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Week In Politics: Biden Rejects Migrants; Funding Bill Work; Jan. 6 Supporters Gather

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., continues to make President Biden's handling of the economy the central theme in the runup to the 2022 midterms. McCarthy is poised to run for speaker if the GOP takes control of the House of Representatives. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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To Retake Congress, The GOP Plans To Attack Democrats On The Economy

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How Republicans Plan To Win Back Control Of Congress In The 2022 Midterms

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Democrats Are Divided Over President Biden's $3.5 Trillion Spending Plan

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Lawmakers Want To Know What Went Wrong With Afghanistan

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Moderate Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia is already raising concerns about the size of the Democrats' $3.5 trillion budget resolution, indicating he may want to rethink what type of package is needed as the economy deals with inflation. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden Calls On The Military To Look Into Making The COVID-19 Vaccine Mandatory

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