Deirdre Walsh Deirdre Walsh is a congressional correspondent for NPR's Washington Desk.
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Stories By

Deirdre Walsh

Allison Shelley/NPR
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Deirdre Walsh

Congressional Correspondent

Deirdre Walsh is a congressional correspondent for NPR's Washington Desk.

Before joining NPR in 2018, Walsh worked as a senior congressional producer at CNN. In her nearly 18-year career there, she was an off-air reporter and a key contributor to the network's newsgathering efforts, filing stories for CNN.com and producing pieces that aired on domestic and international networks. Prior to covering Capitol Hill, Walsh served as a producer for Judy Woodruff's Inside Politics.

Walsh was elected in August 2018 as the president of the Board of Directors for the Washington Press Club Foundation, a non-profit focused on promoting diversity in print and broadcast media. Walsh has won several awards for enterprise and election reporting, including the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress by the National Press Association, which she won in February 2013 along with CNN's Chief Congressional Correspondent Dana Bash. Walsh was also awarded the Joan Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based Congressional or Political Reporting in June 2013.

Walsh received a B.A. in political science and communications from Boston College.

Story Archive

Friday

Angela Alsobrooks listens to reporters questions during a news conference at the Prince George's County Courthouse in Upper Marlboro, Md. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Roundup: Michael Cohen Testifies Against Trump And Maryland's Senate Race Is Set

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Tuesday

Maryland's Democratic primary is shaping up to be the most expensive in state history

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Wednesday

Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, R-La., speaks at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, May 7, 2024. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Mike Johnson Keeps His Job — For Now

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Patti Garamendi (seated in blue) chairs the congressional spouses club. She recently attended a Capitol Hill reception with her husband, Rep. John Garamendi, D-Calif., (standing above her) to tout a bipartisan project aimed at cancer prevention. Marion Meakem Photography hide caption

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Marion Meakem Photography

Bipartisan congressional spouses tackle cancer prevention, and leave politics out

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Tuesday

The Senate is slated to take up the $95 billion foreign aid package

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Saturday

House approves foreign aid for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan

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Friday

Arizona GOP Rep. Paul Gosar, seen here on Capitol Hill in June 2023, announced Friday he's joining the move to oust Mike Johnson as House speaker. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Thursday

Speaker Johnson moves forward with foreign aid package, even if it risks his job

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Wednesday

House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Mark Green, R-Tenn., Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., and their fellow Republican impeachment managers walk back through the U.S. Capitol Rotunda after transmitting articles of impeachment against Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas to the Senate on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Tuesday

House set to hold separate votes on aid for Israel and Ukraine after delays

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House to consider foreign aid while Senate trial on Mayorkas is set to start

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Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas is the first Cabinet secretary to be impeached in roughly 150 years. As House Republicans targeted him he was involved in Senate negotiations on a bipartisan bill to change administration border policies. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Monday

Speaker Mike Johnson announced plans Monday evening to put forward four separate bills to address foreign aid funding, including to Israel and Ukraine. Anna Rose Layden/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Rose Layden/Getty Images

Monday

Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, R-La., center, joined by, from left, Majority Whip Tom Emmer, R-Minn., Republican Conference Chair Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., and House Majority Leader Steve Scalise, R-La., talks with reporters ahead of the debate and vote on supplemental aid to Israel, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 2, 2023. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Friday

Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, R-La., discusses President Joe Biden's policies at the Mexican border during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Roundup: Ouster Threat For Mike Johnson; Biden App Turns Volunteers Into Influencers

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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., talks to reporters after meeting privately with House Speaker Mike Johnson at the Capitol earlier this year. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene files motion to oust House Speaker Mike Johnson

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President Biden walks on the South Lawn of the White House before boarding Marine One on Friday. On Saturday, he signed into law a bipartisan spending package that averted a partial governmental shutdown. Bonnie Cash/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bonnie Cash/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Thursday

House Speaker Mike Johnson says he plans to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Senate Intelligence Committee Vice Chairman Marco Rubio, R-Fla., right, talks with Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., left, during a panel hearing earlier this month. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/AP hide caption

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Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/AP

Thursday

Devotees of TikTok gather at the Capitol in Washington, as the House passed a bill that would lead to a nationwide ban of the popular video app if its China-based owner doesn't sell, Wednesday, March 13, 2024. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Wednesday

The House passed a bill Wednesday that would require ByteDance, the parent company of TikTok, to sell the app or face a ban on U.S. devices. The legislation's fate is unclear in the Senate. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Why the House voted to ban TikTok and what could come next

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