Deirdre Walsh
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Stories By

Deirdre Walsh

Allison Shelley/NPR
Deirdre Walsh, 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Deirdre Walsh

Congressional Editor

Deirdre Walsh is the congress editor for NPR's Washington Desk.

Based in Washington, DC, Walsh manages a team of reporters covering Capitol Hill and political campaigns.

Before joining NPR in 2018, Walsh worked as a senior congressional producer at CNN. In her nearly 18-year career there, she was an off-air reporter and a key contributor to the network's newsgathering efforts, filing stories for CNN.com and producing pieces that aired on domestic and international networks. Prior to covering Capitol Hill, Walsh served as a producer for Judy Woodruff's Inside Politics.

Walsh was elected in August 2018 as the president of the Board of Directors for the Washington Press Club Foundation, a non-profit focused on promoting diversity in print and broadcast media. Walsh has won several awards for enterprise and election reporting, including the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress by the National Press Association, which she won in February 2013 along with CNN's Chief Congressional Correspondent Dana Bash. Walsh was also awarded the Joan Barone Award for excellence in Washington-based Congressional or Political Reporting in June 2013.

Walsh received a B.A. in political science and communications from Boston College.

Story Archive

As police and FBI agents continue their investigation into the shooting at Tops Market in Buffalo, N.Y., last weekend, Congress is considering legislation to address domestic terrorism. Authorities say the attack was believed to be motivated by racial hatred. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Days after Buffalo mass shooting, the House approves a bill to fight domestic terror

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In this handout photo provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., pose for a photo in Kyiv on Saturday. Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell defends Supreme Court on abortion

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What Senator McConnell says about the Supreme Court and the future of abortion

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U.S. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., blamed Democrats for the declining trust in the Supreme Court in an interview with NPR. "The Supreme Court is not broken and doesn't need fixing," he said. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

McConnell defends Supreme Court on abortion, says impact will be 'a wash' in midterms

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., called the leak of the draft Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade lawless and declined to answer questions about the impact of the draft ruling. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Rep. Greg Stanton, D-Ariz., speaks during a news conference about infrastructure outside the U.S. Capitol on May 12, 2021. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Redistricting and Democrats' stalled agenda put this blue Arizona House seat in play

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TV Fixtures Sarah Palin And Mehmet Oz Face Tough GOP Primary Races

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Jared Kushner is seen here talking with Israel's opposition leader and ex-premier Benjamin Netanyahu, left, with his wife Ivanka Trump at the Knesset in Jerusalem on Oct. 11, 2021. Kushner, a senior adviser to former President Trump, appeared before the House Jan. 6 select committee on March 31, 2022. Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images

Supporters of then-President Donald Trump begin to gather for a rally on Jan. 6, 2021, in the vicinity of the U.S. Capitol and National Mall. Some of these supporters later rioted at the Capitol. New records show a gap of more than seven hours in Trump's phone call record around the time of the siege. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Trump White House phone records show 7-hour gap on Jan. 6

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