Jason Breslow
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Jason Breslow

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was not receptive to being asked about his support of former Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Pompeo Won't Say Whether He Owes Yovanovitch An Apology. 'I've Done What's Right'

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Prince Harry (center left), Duke of Sussex, and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, join Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, at a service marking the centenary of the World War I armistice at Westminster Abbey on Nov. 11, 2018. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Democrats have failed to allow for "a robust set of hearings" on impeachment in the House Judiciary Committee, says Rep. Doug Collins, the top Republican on the committee. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

Top Judiciary Republican Says White House Should Participate In Inquiry, With Caveats

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A screenshot of the letter special counsel Robert Mueller sent to Attorney General William Barr on March 27. Justice Department/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Justice Department/Screenshot by NPR

Former speaker of the house John Boehner has emerged as one of the most vocal advocates in the GOP for legalizing marijuana. Above, Boehner answers questions at the U.S. Capitol on December 5, 2013. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

John Boehner Was Once 'Unalterably Opposed' To Marijuana. He Now Wants It To Be Legal

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could soon be facing criminal charges from the Department of Justice, according to language discovered in an unrelated court document by terrorism researcher Seamus Hughes. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

How A 'Court Records Nerd' Discovered The Government May Be Charging Julian Assange

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Matt Whitaker participates in a round table event at the Department of Justice on Aug. 29, 2018 in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Attorney General Says Whitaker Appointment 'Confounds Me'

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A protester is led away by police after disrupting the second day of the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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