Matthew S. Schwartz Matthew S. Schwartz is a reporter with NPR's news desk.
Matthew S. Schwartz 2018 square
Stories By

Matthew S. Schwartz

Matthew S. Schwartz

Reporter, NPR News Desk

Matthew S. Schwartz is a reporter with NPR's news desk. Before coming to NPR, Schwartz worked as a reporter for Washington, DC, member station WAMU, where he won the national Edward R. Murrow award for feature reporting in large market radio. Previously, Schwartz worked as a technology reporter covering the intricacies of Internet regulation. In a past life, Schwartz was a Washington telecom lawyer. He got his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, and his B.A. from the University of Michigan ("Go Blue!").

Story Archive

Santa Rosa (Fla.) County Sheriff Bob Johnson is encouraging homeowners to shoot intruders to "save the taxpayers money." Defense attorneys are aghast at the seeming disregard for life. Santa Rosa County livestream hide caption

toggle caption
Santa Rosa County livestream

Russia's embassy in Washington, D.C. is pictured on Wednesday. The U.S. and European allies are kicking selected Russian banks from the SWIFT messaging system. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

At just 8 years old, Dillon Helbig of Boise, Idaho, is a self-publishing sensation. The Helbig Family hide caption

toggle caption
The Helbig Family

This 8-year-old's book is a hit at his library. He offers advice for aspiring authors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1078478581/1078478582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trump supporters climb the west wall of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. A new survey finds 1 in 10 Americans say violent protests are justified. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

1 in 4 Americans say violence against the government is sometimes OK

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1076873172/1076926879" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Poll: 1 in 4 Americans say violence against the government is sometimes OK

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1076895970/1076895971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., chairperson of the House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol insurrection, testifies before the House Rules Committee in December. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Georgian activists hold posters as they gather in support of Ukraine in front of the Ukrainian Embassy in Tbilisi, Georgia on Sunday, Jan. 23. The British government on Saturday accused Russia of seeking to replace Ukraine's government with a pro-Moscow administration. Shakh Aivazov/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Shakh Aivazov/AP