Thomas Lu Thomas Lu is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave.
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Thomas Lu

Thomas Lu

Associate Producer, Short Wave

Thomas Lu (he/him) is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast is a perfect equation of curiosity, nerdiness and everyday discoveries.

Lu came to NPR in 2017 as an intern for the TED Radio Hour with Guy Raz. After his internship, he continued to develop his radio skills working with How I Built This, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Pop Culture Happy Hour. He pitched and produced All Things Considered's annual Thanksgiving music segment with Ari Shapiro.

Lu was then hired as a producer for Hidden Brain — where he worked on episodes ranging from the benefits of nature to the importance of the human voice to our hidden influence on others. He contributed to the Hidden Brain episode "The Ventilator," which earned an Edward R. Murrow award in 2020.

Prior to NPR, Lu interned for StoryCorps in Brooklyn, New York.

Lu is a 2020 AIR New Voices Scholar. He graduated from Middlebury College in 2016 with a degree in psychology. Oh, and he's a huge fan of the Golden Girls.

Story Archive

Commuters walk into a flooded subway station and disrupted service due to extremely heavy rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida on September 2, 2021. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Climate Change Means More Subway Floods; How Cities Are Adapting

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A firefighter walks through the rubble in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. Shawn Baldwin/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Shawn Baldwin/ASSOCIATED PRESS

9/11 First Responders Have Higher Cancer Risks But Better Survival Rates

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Dew drops collected on blades of grass in Bangkok, Thailand. Anatthaphon Buangam/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Anatthaphon Buangam/Getty Images/EyeEm

MIT's Martin Zwierlein works with ultracold atomic gases. Within these glowing clouds of atoms, "superfluid" states of matter form. Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group hide caption

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Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group

Ultracold Soup - The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

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Google is planning a major expansion beyond its Google Cloud campus in Sunnyvale. Marissa Leshnov/Marissa Leshnov for NPR hide caption

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Marissa Leshnov/Marissa Leshnov for NPR

To Build, Or Not To Build? That Is The Question Facing Local Governments

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A healthcare worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine during a vaccination event at a school in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., on Monday, August 16, 2021. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID-19 News: A Hospital System Overwhelmed, Booster Shots Update

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Steam and exhaust rise from the steel power station HKM Huettenwerke Krupp Mannesmann GmbH on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Duisburg, Germany. Climate scientists reports that greenhouse gases are among the chief causes of global warming and climates change. Lukas Schulze/Getty Images hide caption

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Lukas Schulze/Getty Images

Three (Hopeful!) Takeaways From The UN's Climate Change Report

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Poodle "Lotti" from Austria takes a look in the mirror of a beauty case during a contest at the "World Dog Show" dog fair in Leipzig, eastern Germany, on November 8, 2017. AFP Contributor/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

Standard Wire-haired Dachshund relaxing on a warm summers day outside in the sunshine. Keep It 100/Getty Images hide caption

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Keep It 100/Getty Images

Siriusly, It's The Dog Days Of Summer!

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Illustration of two black holes orbiting each other in a combined accretion disc. Eventually the black holes will merge, an event that will produce gravitational waves. MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Gravitational Waves: Unlocking The Secrets Of The Universe

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Among the topics discussed at the 2021 Alzheimer's Association International Conference were how doctors should think about prescribing the new drug Aduhelm and how COVID may affect the brain long-term. The Alzheimer's Association hide caption

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The Alzheimer's Association

A recent report found that about about two thirds of U.S. adults who identified themselves as unpaid caregivers - people taking care of kids younger than 18, and/or adult loved ones - struggled with adverse mental health symptoms during the pandemic. Maskot/Getty Images/Maskot hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images/Maskot

An Eastern Gray Squirrel eats some seeds and nuts from a bird feeder. Travis Lindquist/Getty Images hide caption

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Travis Lindquist/Getty Images

Who Runs The World? Squirrels!

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The average American eats more than 22 pounds of ice cream an frozen treats a year. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

The Joy Of Ice Cream's Texture

July is National Ice Cream Month — and Sunday, July 18 is National Ice Cream Day (in the US)! Flavors range from the classics — vanilla and chocolate — to the adventurous — jalapeño and cicada. But for some people, including ice cream scientist Dr. Maya Warren, flavor is only one part of the ice cream allure. So in today's episode, Emily Kwong talks with Short Wave producer Thomas Lu about some of the processes that create the texture of ice cream, and how that texture plays into our enjoyment of the tasty treat.

The Joy Of Ice Cream's Texture

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