Thomas Lu Thomas Lu is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave.
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Thomas Lu

Thomas Lu

Producer, Short Wave

Thomas Lu (he/him) is a producer for NPR's science podcast, Short Wave. The podcast is a perfect equation of curiosity, nerdiness and everyday discoveries.

Lu came to NPR in 2017 as an intern for the TED Radio Hour with Guy Raz. After his internship, he continued to develop his radio skills working with How I Built This, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Pop Culture Happy Hour. He pitched and produced All Things Considered's annual Thanksgiving music segment with Ari Shapiro.

Lu was then hired as a producer for Hidden Brain — where he worked on episodes ranging from the benefits of nature to the importance of the human voice to our hidden influence on others. He contributed to the Hidden Brain episode "The Ventilator," which earned an Edward R. Murrow award in 2020.

Prior to NPR, Lu interned for StoryCorps in Brooklyn, New York.

Lu is a 2020 AIR New Voices Scholar. He graduated from Middlebury College in 2016 with a degree in psychology. Oh, and he's a huge fan of the Golden Girls.

Story Archive

This iamge provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a colorized transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox particles (orange) found within an infected cell (brown), cultured in the laboratory. NIAID via AP hide caption

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NIAID via AP

How Monkeypox Became A Public Health Emergency

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Natural, organic, sea, white salt, poured from a fallen salt shaker, on a black table or background. The concept of cooking healthy food, cosmetology. Aleksandr Zubkov/Getty Images hide caption

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In this composite image provided by NASA, the SDO satellite captures the path sequence of the transit of Venus across the face of the sun on June 5-6, 2012 as seen from space. The next pair of events will not happen again until the year 2117 and 2125. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

Venus And The 18th Century Space Race

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What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI
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Making Space Travel Accessible For People With Disabilities

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A24

A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek

K-9 Officer Teddy Santos watches Huntah as she checks a classroom at Freetown Elementary School. If she detects COVID, she will sit. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

'Smell Ya Later, COVID!' How Dogs Are Helping Schools Stay COVID-free

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The Soyuz-2.1a rocket booster with cargo transportation spacecraft Progress МS-20 blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, June 3, 2022. AP hide caption

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AP

Kenyan mountaineer James Kagambi (C), 62, is welcomed upon his arrival as the first Kenyan who reached the summit of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak of 8,849 meters, at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, on May 23, 2022. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

James Kagambi: The 62 Year Old Who Just Summited Everest

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U.S. President George Bush jokes with French marine biologist Jacques Cousteau, center, and Jo Elizabeth Butler, the legal adviser of the Climate Change Secretariat, in Rio de Janeiro after signing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, June 12, 1992. The draft was hammered out the month before in New York. Dennis Cook / AP hide caption

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Dennis Cook / AP

A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A beaver throws some twigs on top of his dam as his partner eats some grass near the shore. Taken in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Chase Dekker Wild-Life Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Chase Dekker Wild-Life Images/Getty Images

Knot research falls into a few categories: knot theory, a mathematical and theoretical look at knots; and a couple areas of research focused more on applications like DNA structures or surgical sutures in medicine Richard Drury/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Drury/Getty Images

All Tied Up: The Study of Knots

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