Thomas Lu Thomas Lu is an assistant producer for Hidden Brain.
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Thomas Lu

Thomas Lu

Assistant Producer, Hidden Brain

Thomas Lu is an assistant producer for Hidden Brain. He came to NPR in 2017 as an intern for the TED Radio Hour. He has worked with How I Built This, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Pop Culture Happy Hour. Before coming to NPR, he was a production intern for StoryCorps.

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Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

The only surviving photo of Vivian Buck, here with her adoptive mother in 1924. This is the moment Vivian is determined by a eugenics researcher to be "feeble-minded" for not looking at a coin held in front of her face. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY hide caption

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M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY

Whose Utopia? How Science Used The Bodies Of People Deemed 'Less Than'

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Our voices convey so much more than just information. They can tell other people something essential about who we are. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute humanlike qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Pets, Pests And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

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Are awards a more effective motivator than a cash prize? Economist Bruno Frey says yes. Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF hide caption

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Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF

Carrie and Emma Buck in 1924, right before the Buck v. Bell trial, which provided the first court approval of a law allowing forced sterilization in Virginia. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY hide caption

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M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY

Would you eat a cricket? Parth Shah hide caption

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Parth Shah

Yum and Yuck: The Psychology Of What We Eat...And What We Spit Out

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What role does biology play in our politics? More than you might think, according to political scientist John Hibbing. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR
DrAfter123/Getty Images

Watch Your Mouth

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Hungry, Hungry Hippocampus: Why and How We Eat

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