Kat Lonsdorf
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Kat Lonsdorf

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Live performances from the '80s rock underground resurface in KCRW archive

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A chance meeting in war-torn Ukraine helps reconnect friends half a world away

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Repair Together volunteers dance to music in Anysiv, Ukraine, after a day of cleaning up destroyed homes in nearby Kolychivka on Oct 1. The after-party took place in a theater damaged by shelling. Repair Together is a Ukrainian volunteer initiative that organizes young people to travel to and clean up sites damaged by Russian strikes. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Young Ukrainians volunteer to clean up destroyed homes — and try to make it fun

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Young Ukrainians are spreading joy by organizing cleanup parties

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Emergency workers clear debris from the crater of a missile strike at a bus stop in a residential area of Dnipro, Ukraine. Missiles struck multiple cities across the country Monday morning. Kat Lonsdorf/NPR hide caption

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Kat Lonsdorf/NPR

Ukrainian troops keep up their counteroffensives in the country's south and east

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Yurii Skubin, 65, shows pieces of spent ammunition collected in a vacant lot in Tavriiske, a village just a few miles from Russian-occupied areas in Zaporizhzhia. The annexation, largely dismissed by the international community as a sham, will likely have real implications for Ukrainians on the front lines who are staring down Russian forces. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

On the edge of Russia's illegal annexation, Ukrainians grapple with uncertainty

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Russia claims its occupied territories in Ukraine voted to become part of Russia

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Vote on so-called referendum likely to pave way for Russia to annex Ukrainian land

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Konstantin Ivashchenko, former CEO of the Azovmash plant and appointed pro-Russian mayor of Mariupol, visits a polling station as people vote in a referendum in Mariupol on Tuesday. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

People arrive at a parking lot in Zaporizhzhia from places like Melitopol and Kherson, areas that have been occupied by Russia for months now. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Russia begins annexation vote, illegal under international law, in occupied Ukraine

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At age 22, Samara Joy is a classic jazz singer from a new generation

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Ukrainian investigators exhume bodies from a mass grave site in Izium on Friday. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Outside a liberated Ukrainian town, inspectors search for evidence of war crimes

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Izium, Ukraine: Bodies at a newly discovered mass grave show evidence of war crimes

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The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, as seen from across the Dneiper River. Rehman/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Rehman/Wikimedia Commons