Sara Kehaulani Goo Sara Kehaulani Goo is a Managing Editor of NPR, overseeing the newsroom's digital content and strategy.
Sara Goo at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Sara Kehaulani Goo

Allison Shelley/NPR
Sara Goo at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Sara Kehaulani Goo

Managing Editor

Sara Kehaulani Goo is Managing Editor of NPR, overseeing the newsroom's digital content and strategy.

Goo joined NPR in 2016 as Deputy Managing Editor for Digital News, overseeing NPR's social media operation and engagement strategy for NPR.org. Before joining NPR, Goo spent most of her career at The Washington Post, as a national business reporter, digital editor and Senior News Director when the newsroom merged its print and digital operations to focus on digital growth. As a reporter, she broke stories in Washington on the creation of the government's effort to create a homeland security and air travel security operation, which prompted Congressional investigations. As an editor, she oversaw coverage of the financial crisis of 2008.

Goo also founded a data reporting and visualization publication at Pew Research Center, where she served as Senior Digital Editor from 2012 until 2016. She also worked as a reporter for The Wall Street Journal in Boston.

Originally from Southern California, she graduated from the University of Minnesota's journalism school.

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Hawaiian language activist Larry Kimura led the charge in the 1970s in getting Hawaii's Department of Education to sanction Hawaiian-language immersion schools. The state, however, did not offer any support or curriculum, Kimura said. So they did it on their own — starting with preschool — where kids could absorb the language from the start. Shereen Marisol Meraji hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji

The Hawaiian Language Nearly Died. A Radio Show Sparked Its Revival

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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