Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a technology correspondent at NPR based in Los Angeles.
Bobby Allyn
Stories By

Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a technology correspondent based in Los Angeles.

He reports on Big Tech, startups, social media, artificial intelligence, surveillance and privacy issues, tech litigation, Silicon Valley culture and other tech-related topics.

He's covered TikTok's battle against U.S. regulators, the fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes and Elon Musk's hostile take-over of Twitter.

He came to Los Angeles after stints in San Francisco, Washington and Philadelphia where he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

Story Archive

Thursday

Elon Musk departs the Phillip Burton Federal Building and United States Court House in San Francisco, on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2023. Benjamin Fanjoy/AP hide caption

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Benjamin Fanjoy/AP

Wednesday

Apple ends its decade-long secret effort to build an electric car

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Tuesday

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an announcement of new products on the Apple campus in September 2023. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

After 10 years of development, Apple abruptly cancels its electric car project

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The opening page of X is displayed on a computer and phone in Sydney, on Oct. 16, 2023. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

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Rick Rycroft/AP

Friday

Popular social platform Reddit files to sell stock in an unusual IPO

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Thursday

Wednesday

The AI-powered Rabbit R1 device is seen at Rabbit Inc.'s headquarters in Santa Monica, California. The gadget is meant to serve as a personal assistant fulfilling tasks such as ordering food on DoorDash for you, calling an Uber or booking your family's vacation. Stella Kalinina for NPR hide caption

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Stella Kalinina for NPR

First there were AI chatbots. Now AI assistants can order Ubers and book vacations

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Tuesday

Wednesday

Match Group, which owns dating apps including Tinder and Hinge, was sued on Wednesday in a suit claiming the apps are designed to hook users so the company to make more profit, rather than helping people find romantic partners. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

Tuesday

Examining the growing movement against the algorithms that control our lives

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Sunday

People walk past a Microsoft office in New York in 2016. Big Tech companies, like Google and Microsoft, and dozens of smaller startups have collectively shed more than 20,000 workers so far this year. Swayne B. Hall/AP hide caption

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Swayne B. Hall/AP

Thursday

Microsoft, Google, Meta, other tech companies slash more than 21,000 jobs this year

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Tuesday

Monday

Wednesday

Everyday users are complaining that the internet is more chaotic than ever

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Tuesday

Everyday users are complaining that the internet is more chaotic than ever

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Wednesday

Artificial intelligence faces more legal challenges

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Friday

Bankruptcies were up this year, in spite of the U.S.'s improving economy

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Thursday

Rite Aid, Bird and Bed Bath & Beyond are among the notable companies that filed for bankruptcy in 2023. Gene J. Puskar/AP; John Minchillo/AP; Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP; John Minchillo/AP; Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Wednesday

'New York Times' sues over AI using its articles without permission

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The New York Times filed a federal lawsuit against OpenAI and Microsoft seeking to end the practice of using its published material to train chatbots. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

'New York Times' sues ChatGPT creator OpenAI, Microsoft, for copyright infringement

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Tuesday

Google to pay $700 million to settle a lawsuit over how it runs its app store

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Google said Monday it agreed to pay $700 million to settle an anti-trust case brought by a group of states focused on the tech giant's powerful app store. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP