Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

Story Archive

In Silicon Valley, startups are laying off staff as investors pull back from big tech

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Why suppressing violent videos is a constant problem for tech companies

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Encore: Look closely at those white Jaguars in San Francisco — no drivers!

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Look closely at those white Jaguars in San Francisco — no drivers!

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Europe has to monitor hate speech and illegal content on social media more closely

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Twitter on Monday announced it has accepted billionaire Elon Musk's bid to takeover the social media company for $44 billion. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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Elon Musk bought Twitter. Here's what he says he'll do next

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks at the Tesla Giga Texas manufacturing "Cyber Rodeo" grand opening party on April 7, 2022 in Austin, Texas. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter reaches deal to sell to Elon Musk for about $44 billion

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Netflix is losing subscribers for the first time in a decade

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Hollywood has found a favorite new subject — the failed CEOs of tech companies

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks at the Tesla Giga Texas manufacturing "Cyber Rodeo" grand opening party in Austin, Texas, on April 7, 2022. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk, founder and CEO of SpaceX, speaks during a news conference on Jan. 19, 2020. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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Twitter adopts 'poison pill' to block Elon Musk takeover bid

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Tesla and SpaceX Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Twitter CEO addresses employees worried about Elon Musk's hostile takeover bid

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