Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
Stories By

Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

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Story Archive

Apple announced this week at its Worldwide Developer Conference a new feature in its forthcoming operating system, iOS 15, that will digitize state-issued licenses and ID cards. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Are On Edge

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Privacy Experts Ask: Should State-Issued IDs Be Stored On Our iPhones?

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California and Virginia are the only two states that have passed data privacy laws. Now more than 20 proposals in states nationwide are being debated, just as Congress dithers on the issue of data tracking. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

States Fight Over How Our Data Is Tracked And Sold Online, As Congress Stalls

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State Legislatures Advance Bills Protecting Data Privacy

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Apple CEO Tim Cook walks through the Ronald V. Dellums building on Friday. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

As Apple's Tim Cook Testifies, The Judge Creates The Day's Most Dramatic Moment

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Apple CEO Tim Cook is photographed at the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Cook will take the witness stand Friday to defend the Apple App Store against charges that it has grown into an illegal monopoly, one far more profitable than his predecessor Steve Jobs ever envisioned. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

A spokesperson for Bill Gates denied on Sunday that an investigation into a prior romantic relationship with an employee had anything to do with Gates leaving Microsoft's board of directors last year. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Epic Games Inc. Squares Off In Court With Apple Over App Store Fees

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In 1995, an online troll impersonated Ken Zeran on AOL, posting tasteless ads with his phone number. Zeran sued AOL, and lost. The person behind the ads has never been identified. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

How One Man's Fight Against An AOL Troll Sealed The Tech Industry's Power

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A federal appeals court on Tuesday ruled that Snapchat can be sued in a case in which a young man used the app's "speed filter" feature before a fatal crash. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Epic Games, creator of the popular game Fortnite, accuses Apple of running its App Store as an illegal monopoly because it only allows in-app purchases on iPhones to be processed by Apple's own payment system. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images

The 26 Words That Made The Internet What It Is

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Muslim Advocates Has Filed A Lawsuit Against Facebook

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