Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

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Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

Story Archive

Adam Neumann speaks onstage during a WeWork event in 2019. Michael Kovac/Getty Images for WeWork hide caption

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Michael Kovac/Getty Images for WeWork

WeWork Prepares For A Second Act — Banking Its Future On The Rise Of Remote Work

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A coalition of more than 30 states on Wednesday sued Google for allegedly abusing its power it has over developers through its Google Play store on Google devices, like Androids. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Jeff Bezos stepped down on as CEO of Amazon on Monday and is handing the reins to his longtime deputy Andy Jassy. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Jeff Bezos Built Amazon 27 Years Ago. He Now Steps Down As CEO At Critical Time

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Bronx native and Associate Campaigner at Change.org, Erni Poché, in the Sutton Place neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City on Wednesday, June 30. José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR hide caption

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José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR

Change.Org Workers Form A Union, Giving Labor Activists Another Win In Tech

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Marc Andreessen, co-founder and general partner of Andreessen Horowitz. The venture capital firm recently launched a media property recently known as Future, the latest in a string of Silicon Valley companies making in-house publications aimed at friendly, pro-tech coverage. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Stung By Media Coverage, Silicon Valley Starts Its Own Publications

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John McAfee, Software Pioneer, Dies In Prison At Age 75

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John McAfee talks to the media outside Beacon Hotel where he stayed after arriving from Guatemala in December 2012 in Miami Beach, Fla. McAfee was found dead in a Spanish prison cell on Wednesday, according to his lawyer. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

John McAfee, Software Pioneer, Found Dead In A Spanish Prison Cell

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An iPhone screengrab of Snapchat's speed filter, which allows users to record and share how fast they are moving. Snap told NPR that it is eliminating the tool. Bobby Allyn/NPR hide caption

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Bobby Allyn/NPR

Snapchat Ends 'Speed Filter' That Critics Say Encouraged Reckless Driving

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The Senate on Tuesday confirmed to the Federal Trade Commission 32-year-old Lina Khan, a prominent critic of Big Tech and favorite among progressives. Graeme Jennings/AP hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/AP

Lina Khan, Prominent Big Tech Critic, Will Lead The FTC

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Apple announced this week at its Worldwide Developer Conference a new feature in its forthcoming operating system, iOS 15, that will digitize state-issued licenses and ID cards. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Are On Edge

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Privacy Experts Ask: Should State-Issued IDs Be Stored On Our iPhones?

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California and Virginia are the only two states that have passed data privacy laws. Now more than 20 proposals in states nationwide are being debated, just as Congress dithers on the issue of data tracking. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

States Fight Over How Our Data Is Tracked And Sold Online, As Congress Stalls

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State Legislatures Advance Bills Protecting Data Privacy

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Apple CEO Tim Cook walks through the Ronald V. Dellums building on Friday. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

As Apple's Tim Cook Testifies, The Judge Creates The Day's Most Dramatic Moment

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