Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
Stories By

Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

Story Archive

Thursday

A TikTok official gives a tour of the company's Transparency and Accountability Centers in the Los Angeles area. Bobby Allyn/NPR hide caption

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Bobby Allyn/NPR

TikTok officials go on a public charm offensive amid a stalemate in Biden White House

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Thursday

Google last week announced it would layoff 12,000 people from its staff, the latest Big Tech company to enact mass workforce reductions in recent months. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

5 takeaways from the massive layoffs hitting Big Tech right now

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Wednesday

Joshua Browder's artificial intelligence startup, DoNotPay, planned to have an AI-powered bot argue on behalf of a defendant in a case next month, but he says threats from bar officials have made him drop the effort. Provided by Joshua Browder hide caption

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Provided by Joshua Browder

Tuesday

A worker walks along a path at Googles Bay View campus in Mountain View, Calif., on June 27, 2022. Noah Berger/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Berger/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. files second antitrust suit against Google's ad empire, seeks to break it up

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Friday

Lensa, an AI photo app developed by Prisma Labs, saw its popularity skyrocket with the introduction in November of its "Magic Avatar" feature that turned selfies into images that strikingly resembled professional digital art. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Thursday

The hit horror movie 'M3gan' taps into our fears around artificial intelligence

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Microsoft is the latest in a wave of tech companies to announce layoffs

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Wednesday

Microsoft announces it will cut 10,000 jobs

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Wednesday

Thursday

Artificial Intelligence is having a moment

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Tuesday

TikTok will be banned soon from most U.S. government devices under a government spending bill signed by President Biden, the latest push by American lawmakers against the Chinese-owned social media app. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Elon Musk (center), standing with former President Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner (left) look on during the World Cup Final between Argentina and France in Qatar on December 18. Dan Mullan/Getty Images hide caption

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Elon Musk says he will resign as Twitter CEO once he finds a replacement

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Friday

Twitter owner Elon Musk suspends the accounts of several high-profile journalists

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Thursday