Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

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In a ruling Monday, a California judge said Lyft and Uber have refused to comply with a California law, known as AB5, passed last year that was supposed to make it harder for companies in the state to hire workers as contractors. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

California Judge Orders Uber And Lyft To Consider All Drivers Employees

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President Trump's executive order prohibits transactions between U.S. citizens and TikTok's parent company starting in 45 days. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

TikTok To Sue Trump Administration Over Ban, As Soon As Tuesday

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Twenty lawsuits have been combined into a unified federal legal action against short-form video app TikTok over allegedly harvesting data from users and secretly sending the information to China. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

Class-Action Lawsuit Claims TikTok Steals Kids' Data And Sends It To China

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Trump Administration Imposes Deadline For TikTok To Be Sold

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TikTok has been under fire in Washington. The Trump administration and some Democrats in Congress have been raising national security concerns about the Chinese-owned app. Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Alleged hackers under the names of Rolex#0373 and Kirk#5270 allegedly discuss the possibility of selling access to hacked Twitter accounts for up to $2,500. U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of California

Florida 17-Year-Old, 'Mastermind' Of Twitter Hack, And Two Others Face Charges

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Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, speaks during a House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust on Capitol Hill. Mandel Ngan/AP hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AP

4 Key Takeaways From Washington's Big Tech Hearing On 'Monopoly Power'

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TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer says Facebook is launching a copycat product to undermine the popular app. Mayer also announced TikTok would make its algorithmic code and content moderation decisions public. Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies Wednesday via video before the House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee. The hearing also featured the heads of Apple, Facebook and Google. Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Heads Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google Testify On Big Tech's Power

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Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Google's Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will face congressional questioning about whether tech has too much power. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP

Big Tech In Washington's Hot Seat: What You Need To Know

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