Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

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The Justice Department lawyers say ByteDance CEO Zhang Yiming has made public statements showing he is "committed to promoting" the agenda of the Chinese Communist Party. Gilles Sabrie/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gilles Sabrie/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In this photo illustration, a TikTok logo seen displayed on a smartphone with a ByteDance logo picture in the background. Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

President Trump said he approved a deal struck with U.S. companies Oracle and Walmart to keep TikTok alive, but the agreement does not accomplish what the president sought to achieve. Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked the Trump administration's order that would have banned Chinese-owned app WeChat, which millions in the U.S. use to stay in touch with family and friends and conduct business in China Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Trump speaks to members of the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in July. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

TikTok Ban Averted: Trump Gives Oracle-Walmart Deal His 'Blessing'

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The U.S. To Limit Access To TikTok And WeChat On Sunday

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U.S. Blocks Downloads of TikTok, WeChat, Starting Sunday

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Icons for the smartphone apps TikTok and WeChat are seen on a smartphone screen in Beijing. President Trump said he does not plan to support any deal to save TikTok in the U.S. that keeps China-based ByteDance as its majority owner. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

In his new book No Rules Rules, Reed Hastings attributes Netflix's success to the unorthodox office culture at the company. Hastings is pictured at Summit LA17 in Los Angeles in 2017. Amy Harris/Invision/AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision/AP

Netflix CEO Embraces 'No Rules,' But Work Is Anything But Chill

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Hastings Writes About Netflix's Cultural Reinvention In 'No Rules Rules'

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ByteDance Rejects Offers For TikTok's U.S. Operations

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Tim Sweeney is awarded during the BAFTA Presents Special Award to Epic Games in June 2019. He tells NPR he is suing Apple and Google in a bid to attack practices he claims are monopolistic and exploitative. Rachel Luna/Getty Images hide caption

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Fortnite Fight: CEO Explains Why He Launched War Against Apple, Google

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