Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a general assignment reporter for NPR.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a general assignment reporter for NPR.

He came to Washington from Philadelphia, where he covered criminal justice and breaking news for more than four years at member station WHYY. In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

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In this artist sketch, Sens. Ben Cardin, D-Md., (left) and Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., listen to the impeachment trial arguments. Several senators report that the trial's strict rules and long hours are testing their mental fortitude. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Then-Sen. James Jeffords, R-Vt.; then-Rep. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., drink glasses of milk in 1999. Senate rules during the impeachment trial of President Trump permit the consumption of milk on the chamber floor, a strange rule that has sparked a conversation on social media. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Lead House manager Adam Schiff speaks to the press at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday ahead of the second day of President Trump's impeachment trial. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

This undated photo provided by the Honolulu Police Department shows Officers Tiffany Enriquez (left) and Kaulike Kalama. They were killed Sunday while responding to a call. AP hide caption

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AP

Robert Hyde posing with President Trump. Hyde has emerged as the latest figure in the impeachment saga following the release of messages in which he discusses surveillance of former U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch. hydeforcongress.com hide caption

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hydeforcongress.com

From Obscurity To Impeachment Figure: Who Is Robert Hyde?

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Who Is Robert Hyde, And What Does He Have To Do With Ukraine?

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A view of Jeffrey Epstein's mansion on Little St. James Island. Prosecutors filed a civil lawsuit that accuses Epstein of human trafficking that victimized young women and children as young as 11. Gabriel Lopez Albarran/AP hide caption

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Gabriel Lopez Albarran/AP

Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's de facto leader, addresses the International Court of Justice during last month's hearings in The Hague, Netherlands. The court has announced that a decision in the case will be issued next week. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

A federal judge in Maryland has blocked the Trump administration's executive order letting state and local governments turn away refugees from resettling in their communities. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Dating apps, including Tinder, give sensitive information about users to marketing companies, according to a Norwegian study released Tuesday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Defense Secretary Mark told NPR on Monday that the U.S. has the constitutional authority to strike Iranian proxies in Iraq and Iran on its home soil in retaliation for attacks on American forces. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Attorney General William Barr announced an update in the investigation of the deadly shooting last month at a naval base in Pensacola, Fla. He said Monday: "This was an act of terrorism." Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP