Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

Story Archive

An image created by DALL-E2 with the prompt: "Photograph of a young boy and his Golden Retriever in the woods of Montana on a foggy day." Image generated by AI/DALL-E2 hide caption

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Image generated by AI/DALL-E2

Surreal or too real? Breathtaking AI tool DALL-E takes its images to a bigger stage

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Twitter's lawsuit sets the social media company and the world's richest man up for a lengthy, expensive and high-stakes battle. Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images; Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images; Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images

Twitter takes Elon Musk to court, accusing him of bad faith and hypocrisy

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Google announced that it would delete location data showing when people visit abortion providers, but privacy experts, and some Google employees, want the company to do more to safeguard data. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Privacy advocates fear Google will be used to prosecute abortion seekers

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In a newly public letter, TikTok's top executive, Shou Zi Chew, tried to allay the concerns of several U.S. senators about the Chinese-owned company's data security practices. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

Where abortion is banned, someone's phone activity could be used as criminal evidence

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Blake Lemoine poses for a portrait in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Martin Klimek/ for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Klimek/ for The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Google engineer who sees company's AI as 'sentient' thinks a chatbot has a soul

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BeReal app is Instagram's next rival for teens

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Claire Atkin (left) and Nandini Jammi founded the nonprofit group Check My Ads, which aims to defund disinformation online. Now, they have launched a campaign aimed at Fox News' online empire. Jon McMorran hide caption

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Jon McMorran

Group aiming to defund disinformation tries to drain Fox News of online advertising

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Why teens are choosing the app BeReal over Instagram

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Meta COO Sheryl Sandberg announced on Wednesday she is stepping down from the company after 14 years at the Silicon Valley giant. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

In surprise move, Sheryl Sandberg leaves Facebook after 14 years

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Federal regulators on Wednesday announced a settlement with Twitter over the use of user privacy. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Twitter will pay a $150 million fine over accusations it improperly sold user data

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Twitch's reputation takes a hit when Buffalo shooter used it to livestream attack

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