Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
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Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

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Story Archive

Concerns Grow Over App Store's Unfair Treatment Of Developers

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Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar, here in July 2019, tells NPR the popular neighborhood app is taking steps to address reports of racial profiling and censorship on the platform. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It's 'Our Fault': Nextdoor CEO Takes Blame For Deleting Of Black Lives Matter Posts

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Reddit announced on Monday that it has banned the popular subreddit for Trump fans called The_Donald. Reddit previously had taken action against the forum over posting content that violated its rules. Reddit.com hide caption

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Reddit.com

Michigan State Police ran a facial recognition search for a suspect in Detroit. It suggested the 42-year-old Robert Williams was the suspect. He was arrested and detained. He and his lawyers say the algorithm failed and mistakenly identified him as someone else. Prosecutors have dismissed the case. Detroit Police Department Incident Report hide caption

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Detroit Police Department Incident Report

'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To False Arrest Of Black Man

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Man Says He Was Falsely Arrested After Facial Recognition Mistake

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TikTok Prank May Account For Trump Rally's Low Attendance Rate

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Apple reopened some of its stores last month, requiring temperature checks and facial masks for customers. It says it's now closing nearly a dozen stores across four states in which coronavirus cases were climbing. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

People raise their arms while marching on Market Street in San Francisco. As tech companies write statement and pledge money to address racial inequity, some Black tech workers are urging for more fundamental changes in the industry. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Big Talk From Big Tech On Racial Equity, But Not All Workers Are Buying It

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President Trump, seen here during a meeting Thursday at the White House, shared a video on Twitter with a fake CNN headline. The social media network flagged the doctored footage as "manipulated media." Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook Removes Trump Campaign Ads With Image Used By Nazis

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Big Tech Companies In Need Of A Fundamental Change To Deal With Racial Injustice

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Facebook said it has taken down Trump campaign ads on the social network that contained a symbol used by Nazis to designate political prisoners. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Facebook Removes Trump Ads With Symbol Used By Nazis. Campaign Calls It An 'Emoji'

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Research firm Graphika says a shadowy group of operatives in Russia produced more than 2,500 pieces of false information across seven languages on 300 different social media platforms. In one example, a fabricated tweet appears as if Sen. Marco Rubio is accusing British authorities of spying on President Trump. Graphika hide caption

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Graphika

Federal prosecutors on Monday unveiled criminal charges against six former eBay employees for allegedly carrying out a harassment campaign against a Massachusetts couple who run a ecommerce newsletter. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Amazon Announces 1-Year Moratorium On Police Use Of Its Facial-Recognition Technology

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