Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
Stories By

Bobby Allyn

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Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

Story Archive

Jennifer Stout , left, vice president of global public policy at Snapchat parent Snap Inc., and Michael Beckerman, vice president and head of public policy at TikTok, testify before a Senate panel on Tuesday. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

A protester unleashes a smoke grenade in front of the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How the 'Stop the Steal' movement outwitted Facebook ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection

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Frances Haugen; Janneke Parish; Chelsey Glasson Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Janneke Parish; Chelsey Glasson hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Janneke Parish; Chelsey Glasson

Tech workers recount the cost of speaking out, as tensions rise inside companies

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Former Facebook data scientist Frances Haugen speaks during a hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety and Data Security on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former Facebook employee Frances Haugen testified before a Senate subcommittee after leaking internal research showing the company knew about Instagram's negative impact on some teens. She says that Facebook consistently chooses profit over safety. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook whistleblower says the social media giant is putting profit over user safety

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Elizabeth Holmes leaves the federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., on Sept. 8. Nic Coury/AP hide caption

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Nic Coury/AP

The Elizabeth Holmes Trial Sparks A Silicon Valley Debate: Why Not Other Tech CEOs?

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The Elizabeth Holmes Trial Is Sparking A Gender Debate In Silicon Valley

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Bill Evans (center), the father of Billy Evans, Elizabeth Holmes' partner, accompanies Holmes into a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., for the start of her federal fraud trial. Nick Otto/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Otto/AFP via Getty Images

'Concerned Citizen' At Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' Trial Turns Out To Be Family

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A federal judge on Friday ordered Apple to loosen some of the rules on its App Store for how payments are processed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

What The Ruling In The Epic Games V. Apple Lawsuit Means For iPhone Users

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