Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
Stories By

Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

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Story Archive

Facebook is pushing back on new Apple privacy rules for its mobile devices, this time saying the social media giant is standing up for small businesses in television and radio advertisements and full page newspaper ads. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?

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TikTok on Wednesday agreed to pay $92 million to settle claims stemming from a class-action lawsuit alleging the app illegally tracked and shared the personal data of users without their consent. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

Facebook on Wednesday announced it would restrict Australians from accessing news articles on its platform. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Facebook Blocks News In Australia Over Government Plan To Force Payment To Publishers

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Parler, a social media network embraced by right-wing users, announced its relaunch, a month after it was dropped by app stores and its Web host in the wake of the Capitol riot. Hollie Adams/Getty Images hide caption

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Hollie Adams/Getty Images

Clubhouse launched in March of 2020, just in time for lockdown orders. Now, other tech companies are rushing to make Clubhouse clones. Sheldon Cooper/Sheldon Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

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Sheldon Cooper/Sheldon Cooper/Getty Images

Clubhouse May Be Social Media's Future. What's All The Hype About?

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The Biden administration signaled on Wednesday that it is putting on hold former President Trump's attempted ban of popular video-sharing app TikTok. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

What To Know About The New, Controversial Audio-Only App, Clubhouse

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Epik CEO Rob Monster standing in the backyard of his home in Sammamish, Wash. Provided by Rob Monster hide caption

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Provided by Rob Monster

'Lex Luthor Of The Internet': Meet The Man Keeping Far-Right Websites Alive

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Meet Rob Monster, The Self-Described 'Lex Luthor of the Internet'

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Parler CEO John Matze said on Wednesday that the company's board ousted him from the conservative-friendly social network late last week. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Parler CEO Is Fired After 'Constant Resistance' Inside The Conservative-Friendly Site

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Even before Amazon booted Parler off its Web service, Apple and Google had banned it from their respective app stores. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Judge Refuses To Reinstate Parler After Amazon Shut It Down

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Web Hosts, Services Connecting Websites To The Internet, Gain More Power

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Gab was founded in 2016 as an almost anti-Twitter. The platform embraces far-right and other extremist provocateurs, including Milo Yiannopoulos and Alex Jones, who have been banned from Facebook and Twitter over incendiary posts. Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters hide caption

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Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters

Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

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