Bobby Allyn Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco.
Bobby Allyn
Stories By

Bobby Allyn

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Bobby Allyn
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Bobby Allyn

Reporter

Bobby Allyn is a business reporter at NPR based in San Francisco. He covers technology and how Silicon Valley's largest companies are transforming how we live and reshaping society.

He came to San Francisco from Washington, where he focused on national breaking news and politics. Before that, he covered criminal justice at member station WHYY.

In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy. He helped lead NPR's reporting of Bill Cosby's two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation's first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects, including a story that exposed how the federal government was quietly hiring debt collection law firms to target the homes of student borrowers who had defaulted on their loans. Allyn also strayed from his beat to cover Philly parking disputes that divided in the city, the last meal at one of the city's last all-night diners, and a remembrance of the man who wrote the Mister Softee jingle on a xylophone in the basement of his Northeast Philly home.

At other points in life, Allyn has been a staff reporter at Nashville Public Radio and daily newspapers including The Oregonian in Portland and The Tennessean in Nashville. His work has also appeared in BuzzFeed News, The Washington Post, and The New York Times.

A native of Wilkes-Barre, a former mining town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Allyn is the son of a machinist and a church organist. He's a dedicated bike commuter and long-distance runner. He is a graduate of American University in Washington.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

A federal appeals court on Tuesday ruled that Snapchat can be sued in a case in which a young man used the app's "speed filter" feature before a fatal crash. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Drew/AP

Epic Games, creator of the popular game Fortnite, accuses Apple of running its App Store as an illegal monopoly because it only allows in-app purchases on iPhones to be processed by Apple's own payment system. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images

The 26 Words That Made The Internet What It Is

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989862270/989981843" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Muslim Advocates Has Filed A Lawsuit Against Facebook

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985475645/985475646" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The group Muslim Advocates on Thursday sued Facebook for allegedly making false statements about taking down hateful and violent content that violates its community guidelines. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

'Stop Lying': Muslim Rights Group Sues Facebook Over Claims It Removes Hate Groups

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985143101/985548321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Group-chat app Discord announced on Monday that in the second half of 2020, it took down more than 2,000 communities dedicated to extremist causes, of which more than 300 focused on the baseless conspiracy theory QAnon. picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas issued a concurrence in a case over former President Donald Trump's Twitter account in which Thomas suggested that social media companies should be regulated like a common carrier, like a telephone company. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Justice Clarence Thomas Takes Aim At Tech And Its Power 'To Cut Off Speech'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984440891/984656748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Discord chief executive Jason Citron talked to NPR about his chat app and his plans. Discord's active monthly users have doubled in the pandemic and Microsoft is reportedly in talks to buy the company. Provided by Discord hide caption

toggle caption
Provided by Discord

Why Does Discord Not Use Ads? And Why Is Microsoft Interested? We Asked Discord's CEO

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/983159051/983619741" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Group-Chatting Platform Discord Might Change Social Media With Its Business Model

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/983157378/983157379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Matze, the former CEO of conservative social media site Parler, has sued the company and its financial backer, Rebekah Mercer, alleging breach of contract and defamation. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tech Giants Cut Commissions It Charges App Developers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/979886135/979886136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SkySilk CEO Kevin Matossian joined the tech company just before it decided to help revive the conservative social media site Parler. Tara Pixley for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tara Pixley for NPR

Why SkySilk Came Out of Nowhere To Save Parler After Capitol Riot

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/978210584/979683537" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A work called Nyan Cat by Chris Torres sold for $590,000 recently. It's part of growing interest in digital assets, known as nonfungible tokens, or NFTs, that are generating millions of dollars in sales every day. Chris Torres hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Torres

What's An NFT? And Why Are People Paying Millions To Buy Them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/974089381/974204452" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

What's A Non-Fungible Token? Why Some Collectors Are Spending Millions On Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/973929514/973929515" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript