Claire Harbage
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Claire Harbage

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This year my grandfather turned 90 and my family planned to celebrate with a big birthday bash. But then the coronavirus pandemic came. Plans were canceled, and a general anxiety about the health of the older generation exploded all over the world. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

"In this work I explore eroding memory. Here, my grandmother, who battled with dementia, remembers the relationship with her daughter (my aunt) but mistook me for her when she momentarily lost recognition of my face. I became unknown but familiar," writes Amy Parrish in an Instagram post about her project "Check the Mail for Her Letter." Amy Parrish hide caption

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Amy Parrish

People picnic underneath the cherry blossoms in Tokyo's Yoyogi Park on Sunday. People strolled under the trees and spread out picnic blankets, ignoring the posted signs about the dangers of COVID-19. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Top: Keziah Therchik (left) and Angel Charles take a selfie before performing Yup'ik dancing in Toksook Bay. Left: Dora Nicholai (in pink) dances at a community center, where portraits of the community's elders hang on a wall. Right: Women show Yup'ik dance fans. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó take part in a march in Caracas in February 2019. Amid Venezuela's isolation and catastrophic economic conditions, Guaidó emerged as a key challenger to Nicolás Maduro's rule, but has had difficulty sustaining his initial mass momentum in support. Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images

Muguntuul Oyutan, 11, walks to school with her sister and friends in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia. Mongolia is the world's most sparsely populated nation, and an increasing proportion of its citizens reside in the capital. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Birds wade on the banks of the Imjin. Kim Seung-ho tallied 32 species of birds in the CCZ in a single morning. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Korean DMZ, Wildlife Thrives. Some Conservationists Worry Peace Could Disrupt It

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Boys play in the water in front of offshore oil rigs at Sixov Beach, on the outskirts of the city. Baku, Azerbaijan, 2010. Chloe Dewe Mathews/Aperture/Peabody Museum Press hide caption

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Chloe Dewe Mathews/Aperture/Peabody Museum Press

Butterflies swarm a flowering plant at the National Butterfly Center, a 100-acre wildlife center and botanical garden in Hidalgo County, Texas. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Butterfly Preserve On The Border Threatened By Trump's Wall

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Davi Tatiana Chirino-Santos, 9, and her baby brother, Arnold Jafer Lopez-Santos, crossed with their mother, Jessica Carolina Santos Lopez. Though the journey was long, Chirino-Santos is looking forward to creating a better life in the U.S. She wants to study to be a doctor. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

PHOTOS: What It's Like On Both Sides Of The U.S.-Mexico Border's Busiest Crossing

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More than 1,200 people, including 1,000 residents of Gangwon province, form the shape of a dove out of candlelight during the opening ceremony. Francois-Xavier Marit/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois-Xavier Marit/AFP/Getty Images