Claire Harbage
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Claire Harbage

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Logging in the recently liberated areas West of Izium is dangerous and punishable by fines. Unexploded ordnance litters the ground. But some loggers take the risk for the opportunity to harvest and deliver the wood to people who need heat. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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How Russia is weaponizing the Ukrainian winter

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A group of Ukrainian soldiers from the Territorial Defense load a rocket under the cover of trees in Kherson Region in October. The approaching winter may force a change in tactics, Ukrainian military units and Western military analysts say. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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With winter approaching, Ukraine prepares to fight on frozen ground

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Anna Mordiukova gave birth to her baby Victoria with a Russian doctor while her village was under occupation at the beginning of the war. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Meet the parents raising Ukraine's next generation, babies now as old as the war

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Volodymyr Korchevsky (center) stands with his son Bohdan, 18, and wife, Hanna Korchevska, outside their temporary home in Lviv. The Korchevsky family left the middle-class life they'd built in Mariupol and now months later, jobs gone, savings depleted and unable to afford rent, they are living in what's essentially a short shipping container, sandwiched between others, in a Lviv city park. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Millions of Ukrainians have escaped the war. Many still can't find enough work

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Yurii Skubin, 65, shows pieces of spent ammunition collected in a vacant lot in Tavriiske, a village just a few miles from Russian-occupied areas in Zaporizhzhia. The annexation, largely dismissed by the international community as a sham, will likely have real implications for Ukrainians on the front lines who are staring down Russian forces. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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On the edge of Russia's illegal annexation, Ukrainians grapple with uncertainty

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People arrive at a parking lot in Zaporizhzhia from places like Melitopol and Kherson, areas that have been occupied by Russia for months now. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Russia begins annexation vote, illegal under international law, in occupied Ukraine

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Ukrainian investigators exhume bodies from a mass grave site in Izium on Friday. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Outside a liberated Ukrainian town, inspectors search for evidence of war crimes

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Larisa, 76, lives alone in her apartment in Sloviansk, Ukraine. She hasn't been outside since before the war. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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For older Ukrainians in front-line cities, visits from social workers bring comfort

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Parents Kseniia and Oleksandr Dryha say goodbye to their daughter, Kateryna, on her first day at a private school in Dnipro. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Ukrainian children head back to school

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Seven months after blowing up a dam in Demydiv, Ukraine, to stop Russian forces from advancing on the capital, the area remains flooded and attempts to remove the water continue. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Ukraine flooded a village to save Kyiv. Residents are racing to clean up before winter

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A man stands in front of a crater that was made from a missile strike in Slovyansk on Sunday morning. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Along the front lines in Ukraine, cut off from resources, a resilient city holds on

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A funeral procession in Lviv, Ukraine, in March ends at grave sites where soldiers Viktor Dudar, 44, and Ivan Koverznev, 24, will be buried, as priests say their blessings and mourners look on. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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