Steve Drummond Steve Drummond is executive producer at NPR.
Steve Drummond 2013
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Steve Drummond

Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Steve Drummond 2013
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Steve Drummond

Executive Producer, NPR News

Steve Drummond is a senior editor and executive producer at NPR who has held a variety of roles in more than two decades at the network. Since its launch in 2014, he has headed the education reporting project, NPR Ed. The nine-member team provides deep, comprehensive coverage of learning and education and extends that reporting to audiences across many platforms. In 2018, the team launched the Student Podcast Challenge. Now in its fifth year, the national contest has received podcast entries from more than 50,000 students in grades 5-12, from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. In 2021 a college version was added that offers a $5,000 scholarship to the grand-prize winner.

From 2017 to 2022, Drummond was also the executive producer of Code Switch, NPR's award-winning podcast and reporting team on race and identity. During that period the national audience for Code Switch grew steadily, notably with the addition of a radio program that now airs on 197 stations. In 2020, Code Switch was named by Apple Podcasts as its first-ever Show of the Year. He remains an editor-at-large with the team.

From 2007 to 2013 he was NPR's Senior National Editor, overseeing domestic news coverage and a team of more than 60 reporters, producers and editors in Washington, D.C., and 18 bureaus around the country. In 2012, he also served as acting Senior Editor for Investigations, managing a team of six reporters and producers on investigative projects.

Drummond brings to his work more than 25 years' experience covering education issues. In addition to his journalism credentials, Drummond has also spent some time in the classroom. In the early 1990s, he left journalism temporarily, for a graduate degree in education and a brief career as a middle and high school teacher. His journalism and education interests merged in 1993, when he joined Education Week, where he spent six years as a senior editor and writer.

Following several years as a newspaper and magazine reporter, Drummond joined NPR in 2000 as an editor on the national desk. From 2003 to 2004 he was the senior editor of All Things Considered. His work has been honored with many of journalism's highest awards, including three Peabody Awards, two Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University awards, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, and the Edward R. Murrow Award.

Drummond holds a bachelor's degree and two master's degrees, in journalism and education, from the University of Michigan. In the fall of 2013 he was a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University, and currently teaches journalism at the University of Maryland.

He is the author of The Watchdog: How the Truman Committee Battled Corruption and Helped Win World War Two, to be published in May 2023.

Story Archive

Wednesday

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The fifth annual NPR Student Podcast Challenge is open for entries!

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Wednesday

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Wednesday

A young Native American woman sits in a museum display case alongside artifacts and human remains. Gabriella Trujillo for NPR hide caption

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Gabriella Trujillo for NPR

Skeletons in the closet, revisited

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Wednesday

The new voice — and face — of the Code Switch podcast! Courtesy of B.A. Parker hide caption

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Courtesy of B.A. Parker

Monday

Wednesday

Author Linda Villarosa pictured next to her book, Under the Skin. Nic Villarosa hide caption

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Nic Villarosa

The impact of COVID-19, a million deaths in

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Wednesday

An officer walks outside of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022. Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

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Wednesday

Alex Bowman for NPR

Wednesday

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Allysa Lisbon/Astra Publishing

Sunday

Wednesday

High schoolers Ethan Lincoln, Kaylee King and Jamin Crow's podcast about their experiences subsistence hunting is a finalist in the NPR Student Podcast Challenge. The students are pictured here at the KYUK radio transmitter site in Bethel, Alaska. Katie Basile/KYUK hide caption

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Katie Basile/KYUK

Wednesday

Friends Jennifer Chudy, an assistant professor of political science at Wellesley College who studies white public opinion around race, and Hakeem Jefferson, an assistant professor at Stanford University, scoured public opinion data together in order to write an essay for the New York Times last May called: "Support for the Black Lives Matter Movement Surged Last Year: Did It Last?" Lisa Abitbol; Harrison Truong/NPR hide caption

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Lisa Abitbol; Harrison Truong/NPR