Sean McMinn Sean McMinn is the data editor on NPR's News Apps team.
Sean McMinn at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Sean McMinn

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Sean McMinn at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., November 7, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Sean McMinn

Data Editor

Sean McMinn is the data editor on NPR's News Apps team.

Based in Washington, DC, McMinn writes and reports news stories for NPR.org, designs infographics, and develops software that helps journalists do their jobs.

McMinn came to NPR from CQ Roll Call, where he covered Congress and politics for three years as a data reporter. While there, he built interactives to help Americans better understand their government, and his reporting on flaws in FEMA's recovery programs led to the agency making changes to better serve communities struck by disaster. He also took part in an exchange with young professionals in North Africa and spent time in Egypt teaching data visualization and storytelling.

Before that, McMinn taught multimedia journalism to interns through a fellowship with the Scripps Howard Foundation.

He is also an adjunct lecturer at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

McMinn is an alumnus of the National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Fellowship and has served as vice-chair at the National Press Club's Young Members Committee. He has also directed the Press Club's Press Vs. Politicians Spelling Bee fundraiser, which pits members of Congress against journalists to raise funds for the club's non-profit journalism institute.

McMinn is from Thousand Oaks, CA. He holds a journalism degree with a statistics minor from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, where he was a reporter and editor on the student newspaper, Mustang News.

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Story Archive

Sen. Bernie Sanders (left), Sen. Kamala Harris, President Trump, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg are the top five fund raisers for the 2020 presidential campaign, according to data from July 15. Josh Edelson/AFP, Ethan Miller (2), Alex Wong, Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP, Ethan Miller (2), Alex Wong, Scott Olson/Getty Images

A tree grows beneath a power line in the Park DuValle neighborhood of Louisville, Ky. Urban environments can be especially harsh on trees. Sean McMinn/NPR hide caption

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Sean McMinn/NPR

Trees Are Key To Fighting Urban Heat — But Cities Keep Losing Them

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As Rising Heat Bakes U.S. Cities, The Poor Often Feel It Most

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Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., walks to a bipartisan negotiation meeting Monday over securing the U.S. Southern border and keeping the U.S. government from shutting down. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Juul Labs, the maker of e-cigarettes popular with young, has come under fire from health officials. Since the spring of 2018 the company has been lobbying the federal government. Gabby Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Anti-gerrymandering activists outside the Supreme Court in March, before the court heard arguments on a gerrymandering case. While the Supreme Court ultimately punted on deciding whether partisan gerrymandering was legal, the issue took on a political life of its own this year. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a celebration for scientists and engineers who contributed to the nation's latest nuclear test. KCNA /Reuters hide caption

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KCNA /Reuters

Open Scientific Collaboration May Be Helping North Korea Cheat Nuclear Sanctions

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