Ian Stewart Ian Stewart is a producer and editor for Weekend Edition and Up First.
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Ian Stewart

Ian Stewart

Producer, Weekend Edition

Ian (pronounced "yahn") Stewart is a producer and editor for Weekend Edition and Up First.

He's followed presidential candidates around his home state (Iowa), reported on emergency food banks in D.C., 'silent canvassing' in Milwaukee, the impact of climate change on Miami's most vulnerable and his pandemic road trip, and he once managed to get dragon sound effects on the air. He created the show's 'signature song' and music starter kit series. He line produces the show, has directed special coverage of election nights and congressional hearings, and was NPR's coordinating producer in Ukraine during the invasion in February and March 2022.

He came to NPR in 2014 after interning at All Things Considered and studying architecture and politics at Middlebury College.

Story Archive

Here's a pandemic pet you may not have considered: Rooftop crows

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How to plan for an unpredictable year

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Wish You Were Here, by Jodi Picoult Ballantine Books hide caption

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Ballantine Books

Famed author Jodi Picoult novelizes the pandemic in new book 'Wish You Were Here'

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Television journalist Katie Couric's new memoir, Going There, is a behind-the-scenes look at her personal life and professional strife in the years she anchored top morning news shows. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Little, Brown and Company hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Little, Brown and Company

Katie Couric goes behind the scenes in the cutthroat world of morning TV news

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An aerial view of Lake Charles, La., shows damage to houses last week after Hurricane Laura, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit Louisiana, tore through the area. Bryan Tarnowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Tarnowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Amid National Crises, Louisiana Mayor Fears His Decimated City Will Be Forgotten

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A home near Iowa, La., was crushed by a snapped tree after Hurricane Laura made landfall with 150 mph winds Thursday. The area is facing two disasters at once. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

After Laura, Learning How To Recover From A Hurricane During A Pandemic

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The expedition cruise ship MS Roald Amundsen is moored at a quay in Tromso, Norway, on Saturday. At least 36 crew members from the ship have tested positive for the coronavirus. Ruen Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ruen Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Members of the Miami Marlins celebrate a 5-2 win Friday against the Philadelphia Phillies. The Marlins' home opener Monday against the Baltimore Orioles has been postponed. Chris Szagola/AP hide caption

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Chris Szagola/AP

Most Vacations Are Off-Limits, But Not This Coronavirus Road Trip

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Bob Marley, who still casts a large shadow on the reggae world 39 years after his death, would have turned 75 this week. Dennis Lawrence/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Dennis Lawrence/Courtesy of the artist

For Bob Marley's 75th Birthday, Ziggy Marley Reflects On His Father's Legacy

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