John Myers
John Myers
Stories By

John Myers

John Myers

John Myers

Since 2017, John Myers has been the producer of NPR's World Cafe, which is produced by WXPN at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Previously he spent about eight years working on the other side of Philly at WHYY as a producer on the staff of Fresh Air with Terry Gross. John was also a member of the team of public radio veterans recruited to develop original programming for Audible and has worked extensively as a freelance producer. His portfolio includes work for the Eastern State Penitentiary Historic Site, The Association for Public Art and the radio documentary, Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio. He's taught radio production to preschoolers and college students and, in the late 90's, spent a couple of years traveling around the country as a roadie for the rock band Huffamoose.

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David Shaw Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alysse Gafkjen/Courtesy of the artist

David Shaw on World Cafe

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Camp Candle/Courtesy of the artist

The Back Roots of Rock and Roll: Part 4

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Dionne Farris performs onstage during BET Presents the American Black Film Festival Honors on February 17, 2017, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

The Black Roots Of Rock And Roll: Part 3

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George Clinton circa 1970 Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

The Black Roots of Rock and Roll Part 2 on World Cafe

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Latoya van der Meeren /Courtesy of the artist

Nana Adjoa on World Cafe

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Sister Rosetta Tharpe performs onstage with the Lucky Millinder Orchestra, circa 1938. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

The Black Roots of Rock and Roll: Part 1

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Black Thought Joshua Woods/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joshua Woods/Courtesy of the artist

Black Thought On World Cafe

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Valerian7000/Courtesy of the artist

Fontaines D.C. on World Cafe

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Harry Were/Courtesy of the artist

Benee On World Cafe

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Chantal Anderson/Courtesy of the artst

Matt Berninger On World Cafe

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Hanly Banks Callahan/Courtesy of the artist

Bill Callahan On World Cafe

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Dumstaphunk Jeff Farsai/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jeff Farsai/Courtesy of the artist

Dumpstaphunk On World Cafe

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Barry Gibb and Dave Cobb On World Cafe

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The Bird and the Bee/Courtesy of the artist

The Bird and the Bee On World Cafe

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