Sacha Pfeiffer Correspondent, Investigations
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Sacha Pfeiffer

Sacha Pfeiffer Lucy Cobos/WBUR hide caption

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Lucy Cobos/WBUR

Sacha Pfeiffer

Lucy Cobos/WBUR

Sacha Pfeiffer

Correspondent, Investigations

Sacha Pfeiffer is a correspondent for NPR's Investigations team and an occasional guest host for some of NPR's national shows.

Pfeiffer came to NPR from The Boston Globe's investigative Spotlight team, whose stories on the Catholic Church's cover-up of clergy sex abuse won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, among other honors. That reporting is the subject of the movie Spotlight, which won the 2016 Oscar for Best Picture.

Pfeiffer was also a senior reporter and host of All Things Considered and Radio Boston at WBUR in Boston, where she won a national 2012 Edward R. Murrow Award for broadcast reporting. While at WBUR, she was also a guest host for NPR's nationally syndicated On Point and Here & Now.

At The Boston Globe, where she worked for nearly 18 years, Pfeiffer also covered the court system, legal industry and nonprofit/philanthropic sector; produced investigative series on topics such as financial abuses by private foundations, shoddy home construction and sexual misconduct in the modeling industry; helped create a multi-episode podcast, Gladiator, about the life and death of NFL player Aaron Hernandez; and wrote for the food section, travel pages and Boston Globe Magazine. She shared the George Polk Award for National Reporting, Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting and Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting, among other honors.

At WBUR, where she worked for about seven years, Pfeiffer also anchored election coverage, debates, political panels and other special events. She came to radio as a senior reporter covering health, science, medicine and the environment, and her on-air work received numerous awards from the Radio & Television News Directors Association and the Associated Press.

From 2004-2005, Pfeiffer was a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford University, where she studied at Stanford Law School. She is a co-author of the book Betrayal: The Crisis in the Catholic Church and has taught journalism at Boston University's College of Communication.

She has a bachelor's degree in English and history, magna cum laude, and a master's degree in education, both from Boston University, as well as an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Cooper Union.

Pfeiffer got her start in journalism as a reporter at The Dedham Times in Massachusetts. She is also a volunteer English language tutor for adult immigrants.

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Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez holds a letter from a Navajo family while distributing food, water and other supplies on May 27, on the Navajo Nation Reservation in New Mexico. Sharon Chischilly/Getty Images hide caption

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To Limit COVID-19, Navajo Leader Says: 'Listen To Your Public Health Professionals'

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Megan Thee Stallion performs at the BET Hip Hop Awards in October 2019. Carmen Mandato/Getty Images hide caption

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Making Sense Of Megan Thee Stallion's Shooting, And What Followed

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Nancy Paulsen Books

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New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy speaks during his 2021 budget address at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J., on Aug. 25. Noah K. Murray/AP hide caption

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New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy: Economic Impact Has Been 'Staggering Across The Board'

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Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes speaks during a news conference last week in Kenosha, Wis. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

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Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

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This photo, reviewed by the U.S. military and made during an escorted visit, shows the original military courtroom at the U.S. Navy base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, on April 9, 2014. Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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A couple has lunch under plexiglass protection designed by Christophe Gernigon at the H.A.N.D restaurant, on May 27, 2020, in Paris, as France eases lockdown measures taken to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Business As Usual During The Pandemic, This Time Through Plexiglass

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In this photo reviewed by U.S. military officials, the control tower is seen through the razor wire inside the Camp VI detention facility, Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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People in cars arrive at a drive-up COVID-19 testing site outside a Rite Aid in Toms River, N.J., on April 22. About 3% of Rite Aid stores are offering testing for the virus. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Trump's Plan For Drive-Up COVID-19 Tests At Stores Yields Few Results

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The original military courtroom at the U.S. Navy base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, is seen in this photo approved for release by the U.S. military. Walter Michot/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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As Pandemic Halts The Military Court At Guantánamo, Critics Call For Its Closure

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U.S. Races To Increase Domestic Production Of Swabs For Coronavirus Testing

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Medical workers prepare to use a swab to administer a coronavirus test at a drive-through center on March 21 in Jericho, N.Y. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Early Warnings, U.S. Took Months To Expand Swab Production For COVID-19 Test

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A Bank of America sign is displayed at a branch in New York on April 10, 2020. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Small Business Rescue Earned Banks $10 Billion In Fees

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