Sacha Pfeiffer Correspondent, Investigations
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Sacha Pfeiffer

Sacha Pfeiffer Lucy Cobos/WBUR hide caption

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Lucy Cobos/WBUR

Sacha Pfeiffer

Lucy Cobos/WBUR

Sacha Pfeiffer

Correspondent, Investigations

Sacha Pfeiffer is a correspondent for NPR's Investigations team and an occasional guest host for some of NPR's national shows.

Pfeiffer came to NPR from The Boston Globe's investigative Spotlight team, whose stories on the Catholic Church's cover-up of clergy sex abuse won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, among other honors. That reporting is the subject of the movie Spotlight, which won the 2016 Oscar for Best Picture.

Pfeiffer was also a senior reporter and host of All Things Considered and Radio Boston at WBUR in Boston, where she won a national 2012 Edward R. Murrow Award for broadcast reporting. While at WBUR, she was also a guest host for NPR's nationally syndicated On Point and Here & Now.

At The Boston Globe, where she worked for nearly 18 years, Pfeiffer also covered the court system, legal industry and nonprofit/philanthropic sector; produced investigative series on topics such as financial abuses by private foundations, shoddy home construction and sexual misconduct in the modeling industry; helped create a multi-episode podcast, Gladiator, about the life and death of NFL player Aaron Hernandez; and wrote for the food section, travel pages and Boston Globe Magazine. She shared the George Polk Award for National Reporting, Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting and Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting, among other honors.

At WBUR, where she worked for about seven years, Pfeiffer also anchored election coverage, debates, political panels and other special events. She came to radio as a senior reporter covering health, science, medicine and the environment, and her on-air work received numerous awards from the Radio & Television News Directors Association and the Associated Press.

From 2004-2005, Pfeiffer was a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford University, where she studied at Stanford Law School. She is a co-author of the book Betrayal: The Crisis in the Catholic Church and has taught journalism at Boston University's College of Communication.

She has a bachelor's degree in English and history, magna cum laude, and a master's degree in education, both from Boston University, as well as an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Cooper Union.

Pfeiffer got her start in journalism as a reporter at The Dedham Times in Massachusetts. She is also a volunteer English language tutor for adult immigrants.

Story Archive

A U.S. military guard tower stands on the perimeter of the detainee camp on September 16, 2010, in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. There are now 39 detainees remaining after the prisoner transfer on July 19, 2021. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Biden Administration Transfers First Detainee Out Of Guantánamo

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Cranes are operated over the remains from the collapsed 12-story Champlain Towers South condo building on July 9 in Surfside, Fla. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Steady, Low Condo Fees Should Raise A Flag – And Other Tips For Owners And Buyers

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News Brief: Budget Proposal, FBI's Nassar Probe Criticized, Europe's Climate Plan

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European Officials Unveil A Sweeping Plan To Tackle Climate Change

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U.S. Prosecutors Say They've Charged 4 Iranians With Plotting To Kidnap A Journalist

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News Brief: Voting Rights, Budget Agreement, Assassination Investigation

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News Brief: Texas Voting Restrictions, Biden Voting Rights, J&J Vaccine Warning

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Investigators From The U.S. Will Help Probe Haiti's Presidential Assassination

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News Brief: Taliban Challenges, Cuban Demonstrations, Assassination Probe

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Army Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, Guantánamo's chief prosecutor, addresses the media on Oct. 19, 2012, at the end of a week of pretrial hearings for the five alleged architects of the 9/11 attacks. Martins announced his retirement this week. Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Razor wire and a guard tower stands at a closed section of the U.S. prison at Guantánamo Bay on Oct. 22, 2016. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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What Might Happen To Guantánamo Now That U.S. Troops Are Leaving Afghanistan

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Dozens of people in Micronesia are suing the Bank of Guam for seizing stimulus checks they deposited. The bank did so to help the IRS recover tax payments issued in error. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Overseas Bank Helped Recover IRS Stimulus Checks To Non-Americans. It Didn't Go Well

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The IRS Wants The Stimulus Money Sent To Foreign Citizens And Dead People Back

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In a letter to the White House, 24 senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

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