John Otis
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John Otis

John Otis

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Shoppers browse at an electronics store in Bogotá, Colombia, on June 19. Shoppers flocked to Colombian shopping malls to take advantage of a day without value added tax, which triggered Black Friday-style shopping frenzies. Nathalia Angarita /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathalia Angarita /Bloomberg via Getty Images

In Colombia, Tax-Free Holidays Lead Critics To Decry 'COVID Friday'

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A Colombian Huitoto man sails on a raft along the Takana river in Leticia, Amazonas department, Colombia, on May 20, during the coronavirus pandemic. Tatiana de Nevó/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tatiana de Nevó/AFP via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Is Spreading Through Indigenous Communities In The Amazon

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Residents of the Colombian capital Bogotá hang red rags from their windows and balconies to signal their need for help with food during the coronavirus pandemic. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

During Colombia's Coronavirus Lockdown, Needy Residents Signal SOS With Red Rags

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Colombian Slum Dwellers Signal Their Need For Food Aid

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In an image from a YouTube video released on Aug. 29, 2019, shows Former senior commander Iván Márquez (center) and fugitive rebel colleague, Jesús Santrich (wearing sunglasses), of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia at an undisclosed location announcing they are taking up arms again. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Venezuelan migrants in Colombia walk toward the border amid the coronavirus lockdown. Colombian officials say 12,000 Venezuelans have taken buses back to their home country since Colombia imposed restrictions to stop the outbreak. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

Thousands Of Migrants Head Back To Venezuela To Flee Colombia's COVID-19 Lockdown

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Pandemic Puts Economic Pressure On Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia

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Patients are treated for COVID-19 at a field hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Enrique Ortiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Enrique Ortiz/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Numbers Are Bad In Ecuador. The President Says The Real Story Is Even Worse

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Official In Ecuador Says Thousands More People May Have Died Than Government Has Reported

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Harold Tenorio is the director of a folk music school in Tumaco, Colombia. John Otis/NPR hide caption

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Afro-Colombian Music Offers Youths A Rhythmic Alternative To Drug Gangs

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Colombia's Pacific Port City Of Tumaco Is Home To Currulao Music

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Men load a coffin onto a pickup truck in front of General del Guasmo Sur Hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador. The port city is the most affected by COVID-19 in the country. Corpses lie in apartments for days and morgues are overcrowded. The city administration requested four refrigerated containers in which the corpses can be temporarily stored. Marcos Pin Mendez/Picture alliance via Getty Imagees hide caption

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Marcos Pin Mendez/Picture alliance via Getty Imagees

Corpses Lie For Days As Ecuador Struggles To Keep Up With COVID-19 Deaths

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Álvaro Callama is an electrician from Venezuela who fled to Colombia two years ago. He says immigrants in the country are struggling after the authorities passed measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus. John Otis/NPR hide caption

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John Otis/NPR

After Fleeing Crisis, Venezuelan Migrants Now Struggle In Coronavirus Lockdown

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Ecuador's COVID-19 Outbreak Is One Of South America's Biggest

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Armed Special Forces soldiers of the Salvadoran Army, following orders of President Nayib Bukele, enter El Salvador's congress during a vote on a security bill on Feb. 9. Salvador Melendez/AP hide caption

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Salvador Melendez/AP

Latin America's Militaries Emerge As Power Brokers, Riot Police And Border Forces

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