John Otis
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John Otis

John Otis

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Blanca Nubia Monroy photographed at her home in Bogotá, Colombia. Her son Julián Oviedo was kidnapped and killed in 2008. The Colombian army is accused of taking civilians, killing them, and disguising them as guerrilla fighters to falsify higher body counts. Carlos Saavedra for NPR hide caption

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Carlos Saavedra for NPR

Colombia's tribunal exposes how troops kidnapped and killed thousands of civilians

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Colombian presidential candidate Rodolfo Hernández receives a warm welcome at the National Congress of Oil Palm Growers in Bucaramanga, Colombia, on June 3. Fernanda Pineda/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Fernanda Pineda/The Washington Post via Getty Images

After Colombia's election surprise, a populist TikTok star poses stiff competition

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Colombia's presidential race heads to a runoff

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Attendees during a closing campaign rally for presidential candidate Gustavo Petro in Bogotá, Colombia. Petro is ahead in the polls for this Sunday's election, but it's expected to go to a second round in June. Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Colombia goes into elections Sunday with a leftist looking to make history

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Colombian cowboys are known as llaneros, Spanish for plainsmen. Carlos Saavedra hide caption

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Carlos Saavedra

South America's traditional cowboys are still at home on the range in Colombia

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Cowboys in Colombia are barefoot legends

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Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro speaks during a campaign rally in Medellín, Colombia, on April 7. Petro is polling first ahead of the May 29 election. Edinson Ivan Arroyo Mora/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Edinson Ivan Arroyo Mora/Bloomberg via Getty Images

He's running to be Colombia's 1st left-wing president. Here's what he plans to do

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Colombia has approved more liberal abortion laws, sparking backlash

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Cartagena's literary festival hopes to inspire a new generation of artists

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Two of the children who came for a meal at a soup kitchen in Caracas run by the charity Alimenta la Solidaridad. It serves about 100 people and operates Monday through Friday. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Why the kids of Venezuela aren't getting enough to eat

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Venezuelans are cooking over wood fires because of a shortage of propane

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Venezuela President Nicolás Maduro speaks to the press at Miraflores Presidential Palace in in Caracas, Venezuela, on Oct. 15. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

The U.S. predicted his downfall but Maduro strengthens his grip on power in Venezuela

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Venezuelan opposition is regrouping after the ruling party dominated election

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International observers monitor as Venezuelans cast ballots in local elections

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