John Otis
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John Otis

John Otis

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Former Colombian President (2002-2010) and Sen. Álvaro Uribe goes to a hearing before the Supreme Court of Justice in a case over witness tampering in Bogotá, Colombia, on Oct. 8, 2019. The Supreme Court has now ordered Uribe be put under house arrest. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia's Ex-President Uribe Is Put Under House Arrest, Catches Coronavirus

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Colombia Supreme Court Places Former President Under House Arrest

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President of Venezuela Nicolás Maduro speaks at Miraflores government palace on March 12, in Caracas, Venezuela. Despite international pressure and attempts to remove him, the leader has clung to power. Carolina Cabral/Getty Images hide caption

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Carolina Cabral/Getty Images

Venezuela's Maduro Holds Firmly To Power — And Squeezes The Opposition

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President Maduro Consolidates Power As The Opposition Grows Weaker

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Police stand guard during a government order for residents to stay home, to help contain the spread of the new coronavirus, as a resident walks to a food store in Soacha on the outskirts of Bogotá, Colombia, on March 25. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

Colombia Sees Bouts Of Looting As Coronavirus Fallout Puts People Out Of Work

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Shoppers browse at an electronics store in Bogotá, Colombia, on June 19. Shoppers flocked to Colombian shopping malls to take advantage of a day without value added tax, which triggered Black Friday-style shopping frenzies. Nathalia Angarita /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathalia Angarita /Bloomberg via Getty Images

In Colombia, Tax-Free Holidays Lead Critics To Decry 'COVID Friday'

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A Colombian Huitoto man sails on a raft along the Takana river in Leticia, Amazonas department, Colombia, on May 20, during the coronavirus pandemic. Tatiana de Nevó/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tatiana de Nevó/AFP via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Is Spreading Through Indigenous Communities In The Amazon

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Residents of the Colombian capital Bogotá hang red rags from their windows and balconies to signal their need for help with food during the coronavirus pandemic. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

During Colombia's Coronavirus Lockdown, Needy Residents Signal SOS With Red Rags

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Colombian Slum Dwellers Signal Their Need For Food Aid

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In an image from a YouTube video released on Aug. 29, 2019, shows Former senior commander Iván Márquez (center) and fugitive rebel colleague, Jesús Santrich (wearing sunglasses), of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia at an undisclosed location announcing they are taking up arms again. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Venezuelan migrants in Colombia walk toward the border amid the coronavirus lockdown. Colombian officials say 12,000 Venezuelans have taken buses back to their home country since Colombia imposed restrictions to stop the outbreak. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

Thousands Of Migrants Head Back To Venezuela To Flee Colombia's COVID-19 Lockdown

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Pandemic Puts Economic Pressure On Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia

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Patients are treated for COVID-19 at a field hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Enrique Ortiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Enrique Ortiz/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Numbers Are Bad In Ecuador. The President Says The Real Story Is Even Worse

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Official In Ecuador Says Thousands More People May Have Died Than Government Has Reported

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Harold Tenorio is the director of a folk music school in Tumaco, Colombia. John Otis/NPR hide caption

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John Otis/NPR

Afro-Colombian Music Offers Youths A Rhythmic Alternative To Drug Gangs

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