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John Otis

John Otis

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Left: Supporters of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro pray as they listen to the partial results after general election polls closed in Brasília on Sunday. Right: Supporters of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva shout slogans at the end of the general election day at Largo da Prainha in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday. Lula and Bolosonaro will compete in a runoff election on Oct. 30. Left: Ton Molina/AP; Right: Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Left: Ton Molina/AP; Right: Buda Mendes/Getty Images

What's at stake on election day in Brazil

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A large fire in a recently deforested area of the Amazon rainforest along Highway BR-319 in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, on Sept. 25. Bruno Kelly for NPR hide caption

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Bruno Kelly for NPR

Brazil's election could determine the fate of the Amazon after surging deforestation

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The fate of the Amazon rainforest may rest on the results of Brazil's vote on Sunday

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A worker performs maintenance on pipes used during brine extraction at a lithium mine in the Atacama Desert in Chile on Aug. 24. Paz Olivares Droguett for NPR hide caption

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Paz Olivares Droguett for NPR

In Chile's desert lie vast reserves of lithium — key for electric car batteries

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As demand for electric cars grows, Chileans face the effects of lithium mining

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Brazil celebrates independence day ahead of presidential election

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On Independence Day, Brazil's president plans to flaunt his military ties

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Chile rejects its new constitution

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Opponents of the new constitution cheer in the streets of Santiago, Chile, on Sunday night after results showed voters rejected a proposed new constitution. Matias Basualdo/AP hide caption

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Matias Basualdo/AP

Chileans have rejected a new, progressive constitution

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Chilean President Gabriel Boric faces his biggest political challenge yet

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Chile's new constitution is put to the test at a vote

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro receives a blessing during a music festival organized by a local evangelic radio station on July 2, in Rio de Janeiro. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Why Brazil's Bolsonaro is courting evangelicals in the world's biggest Catholic nation

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