Jonathan Lambert
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Jonathan Lambert

Jonathan Lambert

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While it may seem that heaps of plastic from meal kit delivery services like Blue Apron make them less environmentally friendly than traditional grocery shopping, a new study says the kits actually produce less food waste. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Fisher-Price has recalled its popular Rock 'n Play sleeper, after the Consumer Product Safety Commission confirmed that least 30 babies' deaths were linked to it. Courtesy of US Consumer Product Safety Commission hide caption

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Courtesy of US Consumer Product Safety Commission

Workers repair the roof of a small shop while a woman hangs clothing to dry among debris in Beira, Mozambique. The city was badly damaged after Cyclone Idai hit on March 14. Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images

He Thought His City Was Prepared For Big Storms. Then Cyclone Idai Hit

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An aerial view of a combine harvesting corn in a field near Jarrettsville, Md. A new study ties an estimated 4,300 premature deaths a year to the air pollution caused by corn production in the U.S. Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsberg/Getty Images

A growing number of women are incarcerated in the U.S. and many of them give birth in prison or jail. Image Source/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Image Source/Getty Images/Image Source

Pregnant Behind Bars: What We Do And Don't Know About Pregnancy And Incarceration

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This colorized scanning electron micrograph shows human cells in a lab infected with "pink" influenza viruses. As many as 650,000 people each year die from flu, according to the World Health Organization. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source