Casey Morell Casey Morell is an associate producer/director of All Things Considered.
Casey Morrell, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Casey Morell

Mike Morgan/NPR
Casey Morrell, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Casey Morell

Producer, NPR Politics Podcast

Casey Morell (he/him) produces the NPR Politics Podcast.

He joined NPR in February 2019 as a producer and director of All Things Considered, where he covered everything from Kraftwerk to vexillology. He also served as the program's main live broadcast director, and still occasionally directs NPR's special coverage of live breaking news events.

Before coming to NPR, he spent four years at Nevada Public Radio in Las Vegas, Nevada, serving as coordinating producer of the daily newsmagazine State of Nevada. From 2012 to 2015, he worked at KBIA in Columbia, Missouri, where his documentary reporting on a religious community in northeast Missouri won a Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award and two RTDNA Edward R. Murrow Awards. During that time, he also served as executive producer of Global Journalist, a weekly public television and radio program focusing on free press issues and international affairs.

A graduate of New College of Florida (B.A. '12) and the University of Missouri School of Journalism (M.A. '14), Morell is an avid soccer fan who loves to travel.

Story Archive

Friday

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks at a town hall-style event at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College on June 6, Manchester, N.H. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie speaks at a town hall-style event at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College on June 6, Manchester, N.H. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Bucking his party, Chris Christie makes his case for 2024

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198338536/1198466402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Monday

A statue of George Washington in the rotunda of the US Capitol on April 16, 2009 in Washington, DC. KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images

A Reporter's Tour Of The US Capitol

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1177709933/1198976106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: A worker replaces a sign over the office of U.S. Speaker of the House Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) after being elected as Speaker in the U.S. Capitol Building on January 07, 2023 in Washington, DC. After four days of voting and 15 ballots McCarthy secured enough votes to become Speaker of the House for the 118th Congress. (Photo by Nathan Howard/Getty Images) Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nathan Howard/Getty Images

McCarthy Prevails, Becomes Speaker In Late-Night House Vote

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147680013/1198976783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

United States Supreme Court Associate Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson poses for an official portrait at the East Conference Room of the Supreme Court building on October 7, 2022 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Roe Is Done — Here Are The Next Supreme Court Cases To Watch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1127510302/1198977248" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Voting stickers sit on a a table during Primary Election Day on August 23, 2022 in New York.(Photo by Yuki IWAMURA / AFP) (Photo by YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images) YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
YUKI IWAMURA/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

US President Joe Biden speaks about the soul of the nation, outside of Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 1, 2022. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Tuesday

Republican candidate for US Senate Herschel Walker walks onstage during pre-race ceremonies prior to the NASCAR Cup Series Quaker State 400 at Atlanta Motor Speedway on July 10, 2022 in Hampton, Georgia. James Gilbert/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
James Gilbert/Getty Images

Monday

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 03: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) receives the gavel from Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) during the first session of the 116th Congress at the U.S. Capitol January 03, 2019 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Friday

Mar-a-Lago Affidavit Released; Combatting Election Security Disinformation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1119648492/1198977548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

An activist holds a cancel student debt sign as they gather to rally in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on August 25, 2022. STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Need To Claim Student Debt Relief? Here's What We Know

The federal government will forgive federal student loan debt – up to $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients, and up to $10,000 for others who qualify. We discuss what that means for borrowers, for the economy and how lawmakers are reacting to the president's announcement.

Need To Claim Student Debt Relief? Here's What We Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1119467695/1198977552" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

A man holds fake currency bearing the image of US President Donald Trump as he participates in a "Freedom Rally" protest in support of opening Florida in South Beach in Miami, on May 10, 2020. CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

A man shows a certificate of appreciation from an American defense contractor while seeking help with his Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) application at Herat Kabul Internet cafe on August 8, 2021 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

The Dire Reality In Afghanistan A Year After The U.S. Withdrawal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1119081484/1198977560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes who is running to become the Democratic nominee for the U.S. senate speaks during a campaign event at The Wicked Hop on August 07, 2022 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Democrats Claw Back Ground In Fight For Senate Control

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118835981/1198977564" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Thursday

Demonstrators gather outside of The United States Supreme Court during an oral arguments in Gill v. Whitford to call for an end to partisan gerrymandering on October 3, 2017 in Washington, DC. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

Wednesday

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney walks up to the podium for a press conference at the US Capitol on December 17, 2019 in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Tuesday

Primary Day In Alaska And Wyoming: How Trump's Impeachment Impacts Both Races

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1117755144/1198977580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Friday

Thursday

Wednesday

Tuesday